All errors should be reported to DonSurber@gmail.com

Thursday, July 29, 2021

Ohio RINOs let killers go free

Marie Rose Belcastro was born September 9, 1920, in Niles, Ohio, the daughter of Sam and Caroline DeGennaro Conti.

She lived in Niles all her life. She graduated from Niles McKinley High School in 1939. She and Fred Belcastro married on May 10, 1941. During the war, she worked at Packard Electric. Later, she was a Trumbull County School Bus driver and aide for 12 years.

She had two daughters, and a bunch of grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

She was a member of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish in Niles, Catholic Women’s Guild, Bon Amici Club, Monday Rosary Group, enjoyed house plants, playing cards, spending time with her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She learned to fly fish on her 90th birthday. She traveled with her daughters to Hawaii, Mexico, and Italy among other places.

Her husband died on August 10, 1989.

She died at 94 on March 31, 2015, brutally murdered in the house her father built. Jacob Larosa, then 15, a neighbor, not only killed her but he attempted to rape her.

Larosa pleaded no contest to the charges, a plea that makes an appeal easier.

Judge Wyatt McKay sentenced him to life plus 31 years in prison, without parole.

The Republican-run Ohio General Assembly and Republican Governor Mike DeWine just gave Larosa a chance for parole.

What a pack of useful idiots.

No, I do not know Mrs. Belcastro. I mean, I grew up around women who were like her. But no, her grandson Brian Kirk contacted me because he is trying to shine some light on how awful this new law is.

The sentencing of Larosa in October 2018 gave the family some closure.

The Ohio Republican Party just opened that door again.

Kirk wrote and said, "Ohio has a constitutional amendment called Marsy's Law. It's a victims bill of rights, and it states, in part, that victims have the right 'to be heard in any public proceeding involving release, plea, sentencing, disposition, or parole, or in any public proceeding in which a right of the victim is implicated.'

"The Legislature never informed my family that they were entertaining this bill."

And yes, it is a constitutional amendment that was overwhelmingly approved by voters in November 2017.

Kirk is trying to get this law repealed because from now on, Larosa will be up for parole every 5 years. 

Convicting a juvenile of murder is not easy.

Kirk wrote, "Larosa’s long journey from suspect to convicted felon took three and a half years, methodically winding its way first through the juvenile court system, then ultimately to Judge McKay’s courtroom in downtown Warren, Ohio."

Larosa's murder of Mrs. Belcastro was a long time coming.

Kirk wrote, "In light of Larosa’s criminal history, better use of the legislature’s time would have been to find a way to better punish and track juveniles when they escape from a detention facility, as Larosa once did. Or, they could have reformed domestic violence laws so that when a juvenile puts a sibling in the hospital, as Larosa once did, he can face real justice.

"The system worked for my family when local prosecutors and a local judge did their duty, guided by law, and gave Larosa the harshest penalty allowed under the law. The system worked on the local level, yet the governor and legislators thought that’s the part that needed fixing? That we need to go easier on juvenile murderers? This unnecessary change reads like a nightmare news story from Gov. Gavin Newsom’s California. What happened to boring, predictable, tough-on-crime Ohio politicians?"

In its story on Kirk's plight, WFMJ contacted Mahoning County Prosecutor Paul Gains. The station reported he is furious because the new law affects the trial of Brandon Crump Jr., now 18, accused of the murder of 4-year-old Rowan Sweeney. The court already ruled Crump is safe from the death penalty -- the same death penalty he gave a 4-year-old.

The state of Ohio failed to protect Mrs. Belcastro from a violent teen, who took her life.

Letting him out again would endanger everyone else in that state, and every other state.

Kirk has forgiven Larosa but that does not mean Larosa should go unpunished. Prisons serve 3 purposes: to punish, to discourage others from committing crime, and to protect us from the criminals inside.

This new law fails on all 3 counts.

24 comments:

  1. I can barely wait to never vote for another Republican again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So what's your plan to let the loony left be in charge? God help us.

      Delete
    2. What’s yours, keep getting raped and saying it’s your honeymoon? The “loony left” is in charge now and Mitch and Lindsey are their 2 biggest boosters!! Keep voting for them. Get it good and hard. You deserve it.

      Delete
    3. RINOs may let this freak out earlier than he deserves, but Democrats would give him the key to the city, you idiot.

      Delete
    4. Save us from the compassionate loons who have no compassion for the innocent, the pure, the good, the descent.

      Delete
  2. What is wrong with Republicans? Oh wait, that's a rhetorical question. Primary them and vote them out. Jeez....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The only problem with primary-ing them is that the one you replace them with with be just another opportunistic Leftist with an “R” after their name. They’re all filth. They’ll tell you what you want to hear until they’re elected. Of course most “conservatives”will fall for it, which is why they deserve what they get- which will be more of what they have now. But hey, at least it won’t be Democrats banging us from behind, right? We have no opposition. No one is coming to help. We’re on our own. I think I’ll just stay home “harder” in 2022. If someone can tell what the difference will be, please, go ahead.

      Delete
    2. I don't disagree with what you've said, but I can't help but notice that there is exactly no difference between what a clearly fed up conservative says and what a dem operative trying to discourage voting for Republicans would say.
      I swear I'm not making an accusation, I don't know you from Adam.

      Delete
    3. Yeah, that’s it. I’m a Democrat operative spending my time on blog that gets no more than a few dozen comments a day. Sorry to tell you, but the real Democrat operative is more likely to be the idiot Republican you vote for.

      Delete
    4. BINGO!!!! Damn Bill, if I could award you a jackpot for most honest and perceptive comment, I would.

      To be honest, people like SpectreRider have bent over and taken it good and hard by left-wing Democrats and Republicans for long they either don’t feel it anymore; or they unconsciously enjoy it and would miss it if it stopped.

      “Do me again Liz!!! You sure are great Mr. Romney. Yes Mr. Kasich your father was a helluva postman and you’re the most holy person I know.”

      Delete
    5. Republican voters are battered wives. “He won’t hit me again. He promised. I believe him.”

      Delete
  3. Ah, another murderer we must release so he can go and write the great American novel.

    ReplyDelete
  4. BTW, how's Kamalala doing with the southern border? Everything Bristol Fashion now?

    ReplyDelete
  5. I am making a good salary from home $7580-$9065/week , which is amazing, under a year ago I was jobless in a horrible economy. I thank God every day I was blessed with these instructions,Definitely a try..READ MORE

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sandra, why don’t you just share your onlyfans link with everyone? Would that be considered improper?

      Delete
  6. I am making a good salary by dragging my dead ass out of bed and GOING TO WORK. There is no easy way. There is no shortcut. Unless you are born to wealth (and there is NOTHING wrong with that!) YOU will have to work, too. Quit yer belly-achin' and get a JOB, dammit!

    ReplyDelete
  7. The obvious flat effect is an indicator. This guy has mental problems and should never be set loose. The death penalty used to solve these problems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm all for that. Convert all sentences over 25 years to air dancing lessons.

      Delete
  8. "Prisons serve 3 purposes: to punish, to discourage others from committing crime, and to protect us from the criminals inside."

    Remember Glen Reynolds comment: Prisons serve to protect the inmates from the citizenry.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I haven't followed the legislation in Ohio, but I suspect it is designed to address a SCOTUS ruling from a few years ago that held that sentencing a juvenile to life without a chance at parole is cruel and unusual punishment that violates the constitution. If I'm right, and I'm pretty sure I am, then what the Ohio Republicans did was ensure that this kid was not going to get his sentence reversed. (Which would have inflicted more pain on the families.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why do I find it impossible to believe that the GOP did anything for any other reason than a payoff?

      Delete
    2. Unknown: that was the party line preached by bill sponsors and the ACLU, so good catch. However, SCOTUS only said mandatory LWOP was cruel and unusual. The Court said 6-3 that discretionary LWOP IS appropriate (and this ruling came out just 10 days after SB256 went into effect. See Jones v. Mississippi 2021). In fact, Ohio lawmakers were warned by county prosecutors and the Heritage Foundation that they should wait. https://www.heritage.org/testimony/ohio-senate-bill-256

      Delete
  10. Brian is right. This is addressed on our myths v facts page. https://ohiocsf.com/?page_id=78. The Supreme Court has never ruled that life without parole (LWOP) is cruel and unusual for all juvenile criminals.
    In Graham v. Florida, SCOTUS banned juvenile LWOP for non-homicide crimes. Under Graham, a juvenile offender can only receive LWOP if they commit a homicide.

    In Miller v. Alabama, SCOTUS banned mandatory LWOP for juveniles. In Miller, the Court held that a sentencing authority must consider a juvenile killer’s youth before sentencing them to LWOP. The sentencing authority must also have the discretion to impose a lesser sentence that allows for the offender to be released, such as life with parole eligibility. So long as a sentencing authority considers the killer’s youth and has the discretion to impose a lesser sentence, the sentencing authority may sentence the juvenile killer to LWOP.

    In Jones v. Mississippi, SCOTUS ruled that a sentencing authority is not required to make a separate factual finding of permanent incorrigibility before sentencing a juvenile killer to life without parole.

    ReplyDelete