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Saturday, April 17, 2021

Air Force brings flying car closer to reality

Sometime next year, George Jetson will be born, and 40 years later it will be 2062, which is the time in which the Jetsons are set.

And the flying car he drove may be ready in time after all.

South Front reported, "The US Air Force Has Big Plans For The Hexa 'Flying Car.' "

The story said, "The Hexa is an electric vertical-takeoff-and-landing (eVTOL) wingless multicopter. It is developed by LIFT Aircraft, a Texas-based company. In May, the Air Force will start testing the 'flying car' that was designed for the commercial market to be used in military missions, including rescuing troops, delivering cargo and conducting security checks over an airfield.

"In late March, one of the flying cars was loaded on a HC-130J and was transported from Ohio to Texas. This was a test to prove that eVTOL aircraft fit to be transported by U.S. military cargo planes.

"The initial test was with a single eVTOL, while a C-130H could carry up to four Hexa platforms, with newer C-130J models potentially able to transport five or six at a time.

"The first eVTOL prototype was unveiled in February 2021, and the first production units were delivered to the US Air Force for testing and air-worthiness certification.

"The Hexa isn’t exactly a flying car, it’s better described as a multi-rotor drone, which is considered an ultralight aircraft that doesn’t need a pilot’s license to fly."

It shows some promise.

The military often leads the way to the development of technology.

The Internet Society reported, "In 1973, the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) initiated a research program to investigate techniques and technologies for interlinking packet networks of various kinds. The objective was to develop communication protocols which would allow networked computers to communicate transparently across multiple, linked packet networks. This was called the Internetting project and the system of networks which emerged from the research was known as the Internet. The system of protocols which was developed over the course of this research effort became known as the TCP/IP Protocol Suite, after the two initial protocols developed: Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and Internet Protocol (IP).

"In 1986, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) initiated the development of the NSFNET which, today, provides a major backbone communication service for the Internet. With its 45 megabit per second facilities, the NSFNET carries on the order of 12 billion packets per month between the networks it links. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the U.S. Department of Energy contributed additional backbone facilities in the form of the NSINET and ESNET respectively. In Europe, major international backbones such as NORDUNET and others provide connectivity to over one hundred thousand computers on a large number of networks. Commercial network providers in the U.S. and Europe are beginning to offer Internet backbone and access support on a competitive basis to any interested parties."

So yes, Spacely Sprockets and Cogswell Cogs may be selling parts for that Jetson flying car 41 years from now.

After all, it took less than 25 years to go from DARPA to AOL.

And as long as the military doesn't get too hung up on diversity and transgenderism, there is hope for a flying car.


20 comments:

  1. No credit given or even a mention of Al Gore?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right, to think the “Inventor” gets no credit?

      But hey, give Al Gore credit for being “Pope for Life” of the religion of Man-Made Global Warming and Destruction of all Life on Earth - the most successful scam and doomsday cult in recorded history thus far.

      Even the current Pope of the Roman Catholic Church worships at the feet of Pope (and future Saint) Al Gore.

      Yeah, he’s not my Pope. My Pope remains John Paul II.

      Delete
  2. Yes, but the important question is, if Murdock crashes a plane in the jungle, can BA make one of those out of cannibalized parts.

    ReplyDelete
  3. They've already got these in Dubai, and theirs are much sleeker looking. Their plan is to have a fleet of flying helicopters to ferry people around. Pretty dramatic video here: https://uaequadcopters.com/dubai-drone-taxis-flying-cars-in-dubai-uae/

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  4. Just don't fly one anywhere near a combat zone. Any duck hunter could blow one out of the sky.

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  5. The military may lead the way in technology, but California leads the way to mediocrity.
    Imagine the skies of LA filled with these things. Okay, now imagine them all waiting for the power grid to be restored when it crashes daily due to the overload.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, there are a bunch of practical issues there. Most of the demand for these (and the resulting traffic) would be in dense urban areas, which are also home to busy airports with busy airspaces. There are lots of rules and regs about going into a "Class-B" type of airspace, and those airspaces are already an ATC nightmare.

      The only way something like this could work would be if it's all 100% automated and the craft are directed entirely along very narrow corridors (like how STARs going into busy airports work now).

      It wouldn't take a large number of such craft to make such a system untenable...

      Delete
    2. I knew Molt Taylor the fellow who built the Aerocar in the 50' into the early 70's
      He had no end of problems with regulations both DOT & FAA. I think this will take a while...

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    3. Douglas, these days I expect getting approval depends mostly on knowing the right "big wheels" and being able to grease them properly.

      Delete
    4. I was trying to point out how it would compound the electric grid nightmare that is our leftist coast. The burrocratic nightmare is another animal I wouldn't care to ride.

      Delete
    5. Know sure if “Big Wheels” is the most accurate term.

      Delete
  6. I cannot wait to see the 3D traffic crashes. Should be awesome.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There will be a new boom in ambulance chasing lawyers.

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  7. Too many moving parts for me. I'll stick with ground travel.

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    Replies
    1. I’ll hold out for teleportation, developed by someone named Scotty.

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    2. Call me old-fashioned, but i have to agree with Dr. McCoy on teleportation: "I signed on this ship to practice medicine, not to have my atoms scattered back and forth across space by this gadget."

      Delete
  8. Screw these...give me the Blue Angels that keep flying by the house. They are at Sun n'Fun flying low as hell. They make these contraptions look like a rubber band powered balsa wood plane!

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  9. What is the weight to horsepower ratio between an ICE w fuel and a battery bank capable of lifting that thing?

    ReplyDelete
  10. Reconstructive surgery Discovering nightlife in Seoul is anything but a troublesome assignment. Wherever you go, you will see Koreans, expats, companions, couples, understudies and financial specialists celebrating it up.

    ReplyDelete