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Tuesday, March 30, 2021

A Bushie now hates all Republicans

Five years ago, the DC conservatives tried to divide Republicans in an effort to elect Hillary. As you may have heard, that did not work. Bill Kristol and the rest of the Never Trumpers then spent his presidency knocking the man and his supporters.

With the installation of the first administration that stands to the left of Lenin, you would think DC conservatives would decry the Democrat plans for gun confiscation, reparations, the end of the gasoline engine, and the rest of the Democrat effort to turn us into the Soviet States of America. 

You would be wrong, because these frauds are attacking the Republican Party for daring to stand up to the Democrat Party attack on the USA.

Michael Gerson turned his gig as Dubya's speechwriter into a Washington Post column. He came up with the Axis of Evil, as he dismissed David Frum's Axis of Hatred, although Frum takes credit for it. I read of this stuff and think girl-fight.

Gerson today attacked Republicans for opposing shutting down businesses in rural areas where the threat of covid 19 is less than in overcrowded urban areas. 

He began his column, "It is the sign of a sickness deeper than covid-19 that the defiance of public health guidance has become a political selling point in the Republican Party."

Ah, the Axis of Covid. I must say it is original and a refreshing change from calling us Nazis and white supremacists. When requiring voter ID is labeled a Jim Crow Law, racism has become code for "I have no intelligent case to make."

Gerson attacked Governor Kristi Noem for not shuttering South Dakota.

He claimed the state is No. 2 in covid cases per capita. He did not cite the New York Times, but it composed the list he ranked New York state No. 31, two places behind Florida.

The New York Times is misleading people.

New York has had 49,623 covid deaths.

Florida (with 2 million more people) has suffered 33,213 covid deaths.

A state with fewer people and more deaths is not handling covid better than a state with more people and fewer deaths. The number of covid cases reflects testing, not an increase in the spread of the disease, because most people who test positive have no symptoms. False positives also inflate the number, but it is better to have false positives than false negatives.

Gerson used covid 19 to make the case for having Washington run the states.

He wrote, "On one large national problem, it has allowed for an empirical test of political philosophies. Under President Donald Trump, the federal government largely surrendered its role in the unfolding crisis, leaving both red and blue states to respond according to their ideological proclivities. Republican governors were less likely to implement stay-at-home orders, and, if they did, those orders tended to be of shorter length. Democrat-led states were more likely to impose mask mandates." 

Smaller government conservatives, meet Michael Gerson, who is a large-government conservative.

Or as anyone above age 10 would call him, a liberal.

He cited a Johns Hopkins study of covid. He wrote, "After adjusting for factors such a population density, ethnic composition, poverty and age, a clear picture emerged."

Yes, if you adjust the numbers just right, anything can be proven. In this case, Gerson fiddled with the numbers to blast all Republican governors. 

Using his logic, we need more Democrat governors. A chicken in every pot, and a Cuomo in every governor's mansion.

Gerson ended his column, "How is this performance by many Republican governors not discrediting, even disqualifying? Does it not concern people in GOP-led states that, at a key moment in the crisis, they were nearly twice as likely to die of covid than their counterparts in Democrat-led states? Why does it not generate more outrage that many Republican governors are continuing these policies even as infections spread and virus mutations accumulate?

"Realistically, this is because the economic benefits of covid irresponsibility are immediate and obvious to everyone. And even twice a very small risk is still a very small risk. But this reasoning requires us to abandon our social solidarity with the elderly and vulnerable, who bear a disproportionate cost in Noem's vision of liberty. And I fear it indicates a wide streak of social Darwinian callousness in the American right."

Noem's vision of liberty is the same as Washington's.

And he fought a revolution during a smallpox epidemic in which one-third of the cases detected died.

Gerson is a DC conservative, which means he is a patsy for liberals. I trust the Washington Post, which publishes and syndicates him, pays him well. Why sell out cheap?

33 comments:

  1. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  2. This guy is worrying about mutations yet he supports lockdowns which only promote them.

    When you "flatten the curve" (gag) you extend it. This gives viruses a chance to mutate as they linger, whereas when it burns itself out naturally this doesn't happen (for a number of reasons).

    What a dope.

    [Typo fixed.]

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Or doesn't happen to such a large extent, rather. Some mutation is always possible, but letting it linger encourages more of it.

      Delete
    2. Flattening the curve means reduce the number of cases. Their way didn't work.

      And we have yet to see how many of the "mutations" will actually be found. After all, the Cooper Crud is nothing but a collection of symptoms.

      Delete
    3. Truth be told, there are two possible interpretations one could apply to "flatten the curve."

      One would be that the lockdowns were basically to prevent transmission - and let the bug not spread to others, and be survived or treated in those who had it; in this way, it would quickly burn out due to lack of ability to transmit to new hosts. In this scenario, the "flattening" (of the total number of cases) would be a flattening of the no-isolation curve down to the isolation curve.

      The other version was that the main issue was going to be hospitals being overwhelmed - which actually did happen in Lombardy in Italy - and that the goal was to slow the spread (but not the total number of cases, as impossible) so that the number of cases at any given time was manageable (by the hospital system)... and that while the total number of cases would be about the same, spreading them out in time would allow the caseload at any given time to be manageable.

      At this point, I suspect that 99.99% of the people quacking out "Flatten the curve! Flatten the curve!" had any idea of what either interpretation was or meant...

      Delete
    4. "Flattening the curve means reduce the number of cases. Their way didn't work."


      When you flatten the curve you don't reduce the number of cases. In the long-term you may actually increase them as immunity wears off for those infected early.

      If you flatten the curve you push it out over a longer duration. That's not how you beat a virus and never has been. Of course it didn't work.

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    5. This is true; however another variable is how rapidly the virus in question mutates. I’d like to see some data on this re: COVID if we even have it yet.

      Delete
    6. Snow, the flattening they sold us on was not overwhelming the hospitals. Yet in the epicenter of NYC they had tons of capacity that was never used.

      Frankly, I think it was hyped to a ridiculous degree but I don't trust them if they provide data to the contrary. They lie so much my default setting is to NOT believe them.

      Delete
    7. From the reports I've read, the best guess on a mutation rate is about 1/month. It's this fast because the virus is RNA (one strand), not DNA (2 strands).

      However, not all mutations survive. From Nov 2019 through Mar 2021 is 17 months. 4 significant mutations (i.e., appear in media), so about 4/17 of those mutations (about 25%) were significant.

      Delete
  3. People still wearing masks have never farted in a pair of jeans.

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  4. Gerson, Kristol, Lowry, Goldberg are all pansies. Thrown in Peggy Noonan and you've got an GOPe daisy chain. These people and Dems/Liberals deserve each other.

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    1. Gerson, Kristol, Lowry, Goldberg are all pansies. Thrown in Peggy Noonan and you've got an GOPe daisy chain. These people and Dems/Liberals deserve a long walk off a short pier.
      There, I fixed it for ya.

      Delete
    2. Gerson, Kristol, Lowry, Goldberg are all pansies. Thrown in Peggy Noonan and you've got an GOPe daisy chain. These people and Dems/Liberals deserve to be hit with a daisy cutter.
      There, I fixed it for ya.

      Delete
  5. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  6. the defiance of public health guidance has become a political selling point in the Republican Party

    Could that be because your rank-and-file R thinks for him/herself?

    ReplyDelete
  7. I think they are afraid of alpha males and females. You know, leaders.

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  8. "Covid cases reflects testing..."

    Oh, if only.

    There was a time in this when "case numbers" were from people who were actually ill with this thing, or who had at least tested positive. And that's what anyone seeing present "case numbers" would expect.

    But as I've mentioned before, I was rummaging for essential-travel information in one (blue) state's web site a few weeks ago, and found an explanation that "case numbers" are no longer based on... counting, you know, cases.

    Instead, the case numbers are emitted by some "algorithm" that just assumes a bunch of things (including a value for retransmission, Rt - one which makes no sense) and generates case numbers... the justification being that this numerical mumbo-jumbo (developed not by the Health Department, but by the Department of Financial Regulation (?!?!)) is required in order to count "asymptomatic" case numbers. Never mind that there is no evidence that this thing can be transmitted by asymptomatic persons.

    I doubt that only one state is doing this sort of thing now.

    Just like the climate cr*p - make up some numbers out of thin air, run them through a computer, and then claim that they are "science."

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    1. EXACTLY, Gander. I’ve got a message for Mr. Gerson, stolen from Dick Cheney: Go Fook Yourself. And after (or if) you manage that, go get me the data that show people who died OF Wuhan vs. people who died WITH Wuhan. What’s that? You can’t find it? Well how about people who died OF it vs. people who recovered?

      Delete
    2. Here in Michigan they have taken to reporting daily mortality count as "deaths" (lately always a single digit number) and "record review" (always a low double digit number); as in 5 and 25 for a total of 30. No explanation is given so I assume they're going back through coroners reports and reclassifying non-Covid reports as Covid.

      Delete
  9. We're all commenting and arguing over numbers that no one with any sense believes. Is a "new case" someone who tests positive from a bogus test? What's the penalty for falsifying a death certificate? The government's information is BS from top to bottom. We are living through one of the biggest jokes in history. Thank God we have Republicans to protect and defend us from all enemies, foreign and domestic, right? I say to those do-nothing bastards, "If you're not against them, you're with them. Stop talking and posturing and actually do something."

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    Replies
    1. AMEN!!! Its so frustrating. Or listening to so called conservative talk show hosts who won't dare say the election was stolen. They completely ignore the mountains of evidence. And this Covid hysteria is no different. I think they realized that their church of Global Warming was not getting the results so they brought out the big guns. A faux pandemic. They've all but admitted that the test for Covid is basically useless.
      Why is it that only 20% or so realize the emperor has no clothes!

      Delete
    2. See my comment above about digging a bit to find out where THEY say the numbers are now coming from. No need to speculate about things - it's right there in black-and-white. The numbers are no longer a count, but output from models.

      Hmm, "model" results rather than real numbers - why does THAT sound eerily familiar?

      Delete
    3. Michael Mann unavailable for comment as he's in court getting ready to lose his arse!

      Delete
    4. There is definitely some flim-flamming going on.

      The number of false positives, the guessing about asymptotic transmission rates, and the corrupted death certificate processes add up to one thing: almost all the data cited by anyone at this point should be treated as a guess.

      I wonder how many people could run a business on procedures like this? Beuller? Beuller?

      Delete
  10. Gruesome Gerson has "gone over to "THE DARK SIDE"...
    and the DARK SIDE will throw him into the deeeeepest chasm...

    ReplyDelete
  11. Thanks for the heads up on Gerson’s column. When liberals I know start quoting from it. I’ll know where they got this Misinformation from and I’ll be able to reply appropriately.

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  12. Gerson is a fraud, just like the Democrats that pay him to write this type of bilge water.

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  13. Why sell out cheap? Because NeverTrumpers are a dime a dozen, that’s why.

    ReplyDelete
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