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Wednesday, January 22, 2020

A republic, if we can regain it

Patrick Buchanan, 81, asked today, "How Long Can America Hold Together?" This is a pertinent question as the nation suffers its third impeachment farce as a House of Representatives tries to overthrow a president over policy disagreements instead of reserving this legislative tool to real crimes that threaten our nation.

Buchanan catalogued past disagreements that led to open defiance of the law. From Shays' Rebellion against taxes to Martin Luther King's civil disobedience against segregation laws to today's sanctuary cities for illegal aliens (and now sanctuary counties against gun confiscation) Americans have a lengthy history of rebellion.

As always, Buchanan offered a light on history seldom (if ever) considered by historians. He wrote, "A constitutional prohibition of the sale of beer, wine and liquor in the U.S., following the enactment of the 18th Amendment, led to massive civil disobedience in the Roaring ’20s, before it was repealed in 1933 by the 21st Amendment."

That is the way things should be. Bad laws -- including constitutional amendments -- must be corrected within the system.

Today's anti-government protests are led by the president himself. It is an uncanny, necessary, and even humorous situation. The only nationally elected official finds himself at odds with the voting members elected by 435 congressional district and 50 states. Congress and the president often are at odds. Indeed, the Constitution deliberately set things up this way. However, by impeaching him, Democrats pushed beyond a civil disagreement.

The Founding Fathers created a republic, which has fallen into a democracy with mob justice superseding the the rule of law. The cancel culture gets people fired for saying things or doing things the mob at any point disagrees with. Mozilla fired Brendan Eich as CEO for donating $1,000 to support Proposition 8, which happened to pass in California.

But Donald Devine sees impeachment as a sign of the death of liberalism.

He wrote, "Donald Trump so dominates the news, he seems to be the cause of it all, with his impeachment by the House pushing that theory dramatically forward. Democratic progressives now believe they can replace him given his low popular approval ratings and are even rushing further left toward socialism and woke-identity politics. Yet, President Trump will surely be acquitted by the Senate and is still driving policy, less so in Congress but still generally rightwards in a modestly conservative direction.

"But policy has very little to do with the present predicament and almost nothing to do with conservatism. Everything today and for the immediate future is actually about the other guys: it is about progressivism’s collapse. Neither side can fully comprehend this intellectually — indeed progressives are still convinced they are the future and conservatives worry they may be right. But emotionally progressives sense great danger, and they do not like it one bit, expressed by their extreme passion for impeachment, from the very day Mr. Trump was sworn in as president."

I get his point perhaps better than he does. The injustice of the mob in forcing girls to wrestle boys in the name of transgender rights may be the tipping point in rejecting progressivism.

When President Trump said he would drain the swamp, he did not mean just prosecuting the worst of the actors. He meant reducing the level of the water of power. That is the real threat to Washington. If he limited his actions to criminal activities, the deep state would gladly hand over Jim Comey and maybe even John Brennan.

But President Donald John Trump wants to reduce federal interference in state affairs. A good example is backing off on school lunches. On paper, it is a good thing to promote healthy meals that meet whatever standards dietitians set today. Remember when whole milk was good for you? However, setting school lunch menus is not the job of the federal government. School cafeteria workers should set it. And if one or two schools get it wrong, the harm is limited compared to the likelihood that the federal government will someday get it wrong at all the schools.

Devine has little faith that Trumpism will outlast this presidency. History places the odds in Devine's favor.

He wrote, "Conservative belief in limited government should have much to say about this progressive reliance upon deep state experts to overrule elected presidents. Instead, many propose additional central bureaucratic control over moral issues. Others support President Trump’s pro-market policies but do not arm him and other leaders with the intellectual ammunition necessary to confront progressivism itself, and the fact that its logic necessarily leads to centralization and Praetorian Guards rather than the federalist pluralism of the Madisonian Constitution."

Buchanan wrote, "For a republic to endure, there has to be a common consent on the rule of law and what constitutes a good society."

That requires good rules. And the fewer the rules, the greater the odds that the ones we have are good. The Lord's Ten Commandments barely cover a third of one column in the Bible.

In 2018 alone, we added 68,082 pages to the Federal Registry. 2019 figures are unavailable.

The rules are written not by Congress but by a bureaucracy that presidents no longer control.

At the close of the Constitutional Convention of 1787, a friend asked Benjamin Franklin what sort of government they set up. He replied, "A Republic, if you can keep it."

We didn't. Now is the time to get that Republic back.

16 comments:

  1. A good example is backing off on school lunches

    No a good example would be abolishing the education department. And he hasn't prosecuted a single person. Clinton was never investigated it was a sham.

    He isn't draining the swamp you do that by cutting off the funds. Period. Instead he's filling the swamp running trillion dollar deficits a year.

    Tinkering at the margins, like school lunches, is pitiful and will change nothing. But it makes the rubes feel good about themselves.

    AS for interference in state affairs he escalated that with the vaping ban. Until the 10th amendment is restored there will be no republic.

    As for the rule of law Trump doesn't believe in it. Letting a president raise taxes violates the rule of law. Same with war and bombs. Same with letting Congress delegate legislative power to the bureaucrats, or interfering with interstate commerce.

    Face it nothing is changing until DC bankrupts itself. Monopoly medicine and drugs guarantees that is coming.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Yep, now I'm convinced the stupid hypocritical dishonest troll is back. If it posts anonymously like a stupid hypocritical dishonest troll, if it dumps buckets of diarrhea like a stupid hypocritical dishonest troll, if it doesn't stick around to intellectually debate its posts, if it accuses others of hypocrisy while it acts as the ultimate hypocrite by the mere act of trolling, it must be a stupid hypocritical dishonest troll, trolling for unrequited attention. It'll soon bring its dumb sock puppets again, to troll for more even more unrequited attention. It just can't help itself.

      It was so much more pleasant when this loser idiot, this waste of a human being, was banned.

      FLOlson

      Delete
  2. China and Russia are the future. They are building wealth. Both of them. The US is pissing it's wealth away. Bread and circuses and wars. Taking on huge debts and now the central bank is beginning to debase the currency to pay for it. This is the way empires historically have ended. And it is exactly what we are doing. And China and Russia are not.

    Keep your head in the sand if you want, but the tide is rolling out.

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    1. China steals almost all its tech to survive in the modern world and Russia is a Mafia run town whose whose capos call their master "Czar". In fact he, not Bezos, is the world's richest man because all Russian resources are at his disposal.
      The USA is the wealthiest country the world has ever known or will ever know. If I were you I wouldn't move just yet but feel free. Vlad will certainly appreciate your personal gifts.

      Delete
    2. Sure they are.

      The Russkies never got past Catherine the Great. Uncle Joe may have made them a superpower for a few years, but even that was more show than substance. They never came close to surpassing us economically.

      The Red Chinese built a big economy on Potemkin cities and 9% growth they couldn't sustain. Now they can't even control Hong Kong.

      If the tide is rolling out, you're still stuck in a sl;ough 10 miles upstream.

      Delete
    3. These are nice, patriotic replies you two have given me, but they don't challenge the basic premise. Which is that China and Russia are aquiring and building wealth, while the US is pissing it's wealth away. These facts are undisputable.

      While China has wasted some of its wealth on ghost cities and the like, they are still net net aquiring and building wealth.
      Russia is not a very productive country, but what wealth they are producing they are letting it build.
      Both are getting stronger and richer.

      The US is pissing it all away. Why deny it?

      Delete
    4. > These facts are undisputable.

      "These" aren't facts; they are conclusions. You didn't show your work.

      Maybe you're right, but the facts aren't in evidence here.

      Delete
    5. I do not disagree that both China and Russia are getting stronger, but if China and Russia were as you proclaim, then THEY would be the two countries that other countries would invest heavily in, not the USA. I agree, that our stupid Congress has pissed away not only past and present wealth, but is pissing away future wealth too, as can readily be seen with our debt. But, you sugar coat China's and Russia's finances by not mentioning THEIR own economic problems. edutcher mentioned China's big bubble, and yet you blew right past that huge problem. You remember our bubble in 2008, and what happened when it burst? What do you think will happen to China when their bubble, which is way worse than ours was, busts? And Russia is pissing some of their wealth away in Syria, which you did NOT mention. Nor, did you mention how the US's fracking has undercut the monopoly they once had in supplying fuel to Europe.

      Thus, you show you are not serious in your intellectual discussion, and I suspect you are just a gentler (if there can be one) version of the stupid hypocritical dishonest troll. Prove me wrong, by first, putting an identifier with your posts. Then, honestly and intellectually DEFEND your posts. Which means, addressing the points others bring up to factually counter your propaganda. I'll be waiting, without of course, holding my breath.

      FLOlson

      Delete
  3. Joe Biden: “I have a great respect and reverence for the Senate–for real. And I was embarrassed for the institution. I wasn’t embarrassed when Hunter was schtupping his dead brother’s wife or banging strippers or getting kicked out the Navy for doing blow or taking massive payoffs from Ukrainians, Chinese, Russians, Bulgarians and Kazakhs while I was handing out foreign aid and policy favors–but I was embarrassed for the Senate.”

    ReplyDelete
  4. "Remember when whole milk was good for you?"
    "And if one or two schools get it wrong, the harm is limited compared to the likelihood that the federal government will someday get it wrong at all the schools"
    The federal government did get it wrong, during the reign of Barack the Magnificent. They mandated lowfat milk and now it turns out that whole milk actually helps prevent obesity!

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  5. Devine has little faith that Trumpism will outlast this presidency.

    Trumpism works. That's why it isn't dying out any time soon.

    And I think there are more people who were waiting for someone to start fighting back than most of the illuminati ever believed. These are the people that will carry the mantle.

    Buchanan has been living in his own world for a long time and I think he has a romantic view of the old one.

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  6. Bottom line: Patrick was a loser. Both the message and the messenger must be on point to effect REAL change. At this point, I have no doubt Mr. T IS going to deliver that 44-6 ass whuppin. The key will be to convince voters to go straight R down ticket. Hard sell, but I’d point to the impeachment vote in the House (and eventually the Senate vote) and say, simply, “He/She/It is against our guy. Don’t listen to what they say. Look at what they DO.” K-Mac has done a superb job keeping the R House in line. 2021-23 could be “Turn out the lights, the Party’s over” for the LibCommies, with up to 6 federal departments being eliminated or combined...

    Energy - Kill
    Education - Kill
    Interior - Move
    Agriculture - Move
    FBI, CIA, DHS, ICE - Combine, Reduce, Move (Dallas would be my choice)
    Health & Human Services, Housing & Urban Development - Combine, Move
    Transportation - Kill

    That’s a start...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds fabulous but it would throw about 200k civil “servants” out of work so would be some short term pain. Globalists were fine with blue collars losing their jobs to China and Mexico so too bad.

      Delete
    2. They can learn to code. - GOC

      Delete
  7. "Progressivism" (what an Orwellian term for those who would impose a discredited 19th Century economic philosophy) is like rust - one or two corrective measures (Reagan, Trump)isn't enough because it just comes back. Those who want tyranny have time on their side. Man's heart tends to despotism, continually.

    ReplyDelete