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Thursday, December 21, 2017

President Trump is Santa Claus

From Trump the Press:
In a column in Slate, Reihan Salam, executive editor of the National Review, recalled growing up in Brooklyn in the 1980s and 1990s. “Trump was the living embodiment of gaudy success — a kind of mash-up of Santa Claus, Scrooge McDuck, and Vito Corleone. When I was a kid, it was not at all uncommon to hear friends and classmates declare that they wanted to be Donald Trump when they grew up. They didn’t want to be real estate developers or casino magnates. They literally wanted to be Trump, which seems doubly strange in hindsight, as so few of the kids I have in mind were white,” Salam wrote on February 11, 2016.
With the tax cut, we see the Santa side.



Reaction to the tax cut's passage on Wednesday was swift. AT and T, Comcast, FirstThird Bank, and Wells Fargo tripped over one another to get out the message that they would give each employee a $1,000 bonus. Boeing announced a similar -- although convoluted -- employee bonus system.

Philip DeVoe in the National Review wrote stiffly: "It’s good early news for the GOP, which faces a tough road ahead selling the bill as a success."

You will notice something about these presents that Santa Trump is passing out.

He is not paying for them.

The companies are.

What Santa does is inject a spirit of giving.

Which is what President Trump is doing.

The money for these gifts does not come from Santa Trump, but from the companies themselves, just as your parents (or other benevolent person) paid for your Christmas presents when you were a child.

This of course mimics the greatest Christmas gift ever given -- everlasting life.

But this is not a theological blog, but rather a man trying to explain what is going on.

Santa Claus is a jolly old elf, but the real heroes are the parents and others who give at Christmas.

We credit President Trump for his leadership in both getting the taxes cut and in inspiring employers to open the purse strings.

But the CEOs are making the right call. I imagine the signal is that they will repatriate overseas earnings, and invest in making America great again -- because such an investment makes sense again.

They will need good people to do the work. Those bonuses make sense.

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Please enjoy my two books about the press and how it missed the rise of Donald Trump.

The first was "Trump the Press," which covered his nomination.

The second was "Trump the Establishment," which covered his election.

To order autographed copies, write DonSurber@GMail.com.

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As always, Make America Great Again.

13 comments:

  1. How is Trump a mafioso? Trump was a bare knuckles businessman which people understand. The continued sniffing by self appointed "elites" is not only tiresome but wrong. They respect "class" more than success which is because they can define themselves as "class" or elites without doing anything worthwhile or having any merit to a society. It is becoming clearer and clearer what these merit-less clunkers are and that they are hanging on by their grubby fingernails. Time for them to go away. They contribute nothing

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    1. And of course none of those 'elite' twits actually does anything useful for "work" - or even knows HOW to do anything useful: that actually contributes to the country's/world's output of goods and services for their R~I~C~H salaries.

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  2. OOOOOOOh, this makes the Dems so MADDDDD. Mad. Spitting mad. Boiling mad. Fun to watch.

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  3. And he let Rubashkin out! On the last day of Chanukah, too. Now to get Linda Reade behind bars. Maybe we can dedicate a new upscale, elite women's prison for Hillary, Loretta, Linda ... ("Freshly cleaned servers every day! Extra long sentences! Talk about your grandchildren and their golf games until lights out!")

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  4. I often joke that I want to be Pinochet when I grow up so I can give helicopter rides ;)

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  5. As much as I like a bonus, I would much rather have a pay raise. The bonus is a 1-shot increase in income, but a pay raise gives every payday till I retire. A $1000 bonus is about 50 cents per hour for one year. A $0.10 per hour pay raise will take 5 years to equal that bonus...but after that, it is all bonus-Plus!!! If you work any overtime, that reduces the hourly rate for your bonus, but reduces the break even time for a pay raise.

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    1. Don't worry about it, dude. Those come next. MAGA.

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  6. The CEO of Intel had an interesting comment a few months ago.

    It said it was costing the company $2 billion a year more for major factories within the US then in locations outside the US (China, Ireland, Israel, Costa Rica). If this bill had not passed, he would have been forced to move more of his US factories overseas. If the bill did pass, he would be thinking about moving some of the overseas work back to the US.

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    1. That's the plan. We want all those outsourced companies to come back. If we eliminate enough restrictive taxes and regulations, we can make that an appealing option, even without illegal alien labor.

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    2. I remember a tech boss years ago saying that any CEO who builds a factory in California should be fired.

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  7. "They literally wanted to be Trump, which seems doubly strange in hindsight, as so few of the kids I have in mind were white.” See, SJWs? 'Muh representation' means absolutely nothing.

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  8. So this guy Reihan Salam is the Executive Editor of National Review; he also writes for Slate. Why am I not surprised?

    National Review doesn't appear to be American any longer. Both NR and the Weakly Standard are places that I never go any more; they've sold whatever is left of their soul, and they can be depended upon for being anti-wholesome, often anti-American and always anti-President Trump.

    It's no surprise that other nonwhite children in Salam's neighborhood wanted to be Donald Trump; they had, and probably still have, more appreciation for being in America that he does, and they wanted to be successful too!

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    1. Slate and National Review are just different sides of the same deep state coin nowadays.

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