All errors should be reported to DonSurber@gmail.com

Thursday, August 17, 2017

No, Civil Rights did not give Republicans the South

In light of Charlottesville, Mary C. Curtis played her race card.

I shall toss it back in her face with just the facts, ma'am.



But the current president did not magically drop out of the sky into the Oval Office. He arrived on the “wink, wink, nudge, nudge” racial political game the GOP has been playing since Democrat Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act and Republican Barry Goldwater opposed it.
Now for the rest of the story.

The Civil Rights Act passed because 27 of the 33 Republican senators supported it -- a higher percentage than Democrats did. (The difference is minuscule.)

All 22 Democratic senators from the South (as defined by the 11 Confederate states) opposed it -- as did enough bigots like Bobby Byrd to filibuster the bill as they had for decades.

Johnson needed 67 votes to stop the filibuster. Republicans delivered far more than the 23 votes he needed from then.

Their reward was to be portrayed as racists.

The liberal fantasy is that in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Democrats selflessly sacrificed all those white votes in the Deep South. The reality is, Democrats kept the South and thanks to the Coting Rights Act of 1965, forced states to create black majority districts.

That racial gerrymandering -- upheld by the courts -- led to the Congressional Black Caucus. The Democratic Congress included simultaneously klansman Bobby Byrd and Black Panther co-founder Bobby Rush.

To be sure, Republicans control Southern politics now. 

The fact is the Democratic Party controlled the legislatures of the 11 Confederate states from Reconstruction until the 1990s -- a period of more than a century.

Looking at the lower legislative houses in those states we find Tennessee's House flipped in 1968, but flipped back in 1970 and stayed that way until 2008.

The other House flips: North Carolina in 1994, South Carolina and Florida in 1996, Virginia in 2000, Texas in 2003, Georgia in 2005, Louisiana in 2008, Alabama in 2010, and Arkansas and Mississippi in 2012.

Of the 22 Dixiecrats who voted against civil rights in 1964, 21 remained Democrats. Only Strom Thurmond switched parties, becoming a Republican after the act passed.

Indeed, after the civil rights act, in 1976, the South elected its first president since antebellum, as Jimmy Carter held together a coalition of white Southerners and black urbanites, fulfilling LBJ's cynical playing of both sides against each other in racial politics.

Mary C. Curtis can stereotype Republicans as racial bigots all she wants.

But she is wrong.

Haters usually are.

***

Please enjoy my books on how the press bungled the 2016 election.




Caution: Readers occasionally may laugh out loud at the media as they read this account of Trump's election.

It is available on Kindle, and in paperback.



Caution: Readers occasionally may laugh out loud at the media as they read this account of Trump's nomination.

It is available on Kindle, and in paperback.

Autographed copies of both books are available by writing me at DonSurber@GMail.com

Please follow me on Twitter.

Friend me on Facebook.

9 comments:

  1. I grew up in western NC. Up until about 1980 Democrats OWNED the South. If Republicans had not pushed the Civil Rights Act it never would have passed. And as for LBJ he commented after the act was passed something to the effect of "I'll have those niggers voting Democrat for 200 years".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So far he is 25% on the way.

      Delete
    2. In 1983 I took an American History class in college. I remember the prof mentioning that the largest political gathering in the south was the Texas Democratic Primary. I scoffed until I looked it up for myself.

      Delete
  2. Thanks. I hadn't come across this information (but had heard the accusation, which somehow seems to have totally hinged in Strom Thurmond and him alone). I've bookmarked this in case I need to link it to one of my leftist friends' Facebook posts in the future!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I've never heard that theory being promoted by anyone from the south. If there was such a big effect the transition wouldn't have taken fifty years to be completed. Fact is most people who vote democrat are knee jerk thoughtless idiots and will continue to do so past any point of utility, so if there is any truth at all to the theory this cold hard fact will have to be admitted.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Didja notice that all of those statues being torn down are Dimocrats? They're trying to whitewash their racist past. Speaking of racists, which party has kept blacks poor, uneducated, and dependent upon the government for the past 50 years?

    Dennis Howell, LBJ said that about welfare... GOC

    ReplyDelete
  5. Don, as I recall it, LBJ was not in favor of the civil rights act. It was a hand full of northern dems who joined with the solid republican panel, and Hubert Humphrey from Minnesota was the man who went to LBJ and convinced him to sign the legislation. He was like the groom at an ArKansas wedding, hauled hog tied to the alter and threaten with buckshot if he didn't say "I do".
    Growing up in Minnesota, that was something they were proud of.

    ReplyDelete
  6. A conveniently forgotten fact: Democrats ruled the south all through slavery. Democrats subjugated blacks. The KKK was started and run by democrats. No Republican ex KKK members ruled in the congress during our lifetime, however a democrat KKK member did until only a few years ago, and guess who gave a speech praising him to the heavens? Nancy (Trump is a White Supremacist) Pelosi! Isn't something a little twisted here?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Pulling down statues of Confederate generals, elected officials (e.g., Jefferson Davis) throughout the South. The leading groups doing this are Communists, anarchists, anti-capitalists. We Republicans should propose replacing them with black Republicans (say SCOTUS Justice Clarence Thomas) and Republican Presidents such as Abraham Lincoln & Ronald Reagan.

    ReplyDelete