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Friday, July 28, 2017

A subtle hit job by NPR

How do you portray the Trump administration as unethical?

Let NPR show the way.



Kellyanne Conway dared to complain on Fox and Friends on Thursday about the paperwork the government loads up in the name of "government ethics."

According to NPR:
Top executive branch employees have 30 days after assuming office to submit a report showing their income in "dividends, rents, interest, and capital gains, received during the preceding calendar year which exceeds $200 in amount or value."
Everything that exceeds $200?

What is this the 18th century when we still had half-pennies and a dollar a week was a good wage?

Her complaint is legitimate. Americans like to keep their personal information private. Having to disclose one's finances is a disincentive to give up a seven-figure job and go to work for the government.

NPR decided to torpedo her complaint by slipping this in:
Kathleen Clark, an ethics law professor at Washington University in St. Louis, disagreed about the impact of ethics disclosure forms, saying they help ensure that government employees prioritize the public good.
"Someone who is not used to putting the interests of the people first is probably more likely to see this as an inappropriate burden, but if you put it into the context of the ethics laws, it makes sense that people have a requirement to make these disclosures," Clark said.
Fine there's another side of the story. Tell both sides.

Except, NPR did not do that.

It allowed Clark to slime Conway as a selfish person ("someone who is not used to putting the interests of the people first") without allowing Conway to respond.

And NPR did not bother to call another "ethics law professor" to tell the downside to public disclosure forms.

This is a legitimate problem -- and it is designed that way.

Just as Congress set up the McCain-Feingold Act to protect incumbents, so our ethics laws work to keep outsiders out. There are many people who would gladly serve, except besides giving up million-dollar salaries, they would have to undergo a public financial colonoscopy.

A man worth $85 million is a lot harder to bribe than one worth $85.

And yet our ethics paperwork makes it harder for the $85 million man to serve government.

At any rate, NPR let Clark slime Conway without allowing Conway to respond to Clark.

That is the way you do it, kiddies.

And it is pretty unethical.




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8 comments:

  1. You expected ethical behavior from a radio network dominated by leftists who are sucking at the government's teat? (I know you did not!)

    The fed should require all managers of entities who receive tax dollar subsidies to file the same paperwork.

    ReplyDelete
  2. NPR says most of it's funds are donations. Trump would help remove a leftist political craniotomy tool used mostly on the young by withdrawing all public Support. Let NPR be want it wants to be, then remove its name "national public" replacing it with something else more appropriate, something it's donors like. Let them choose.

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  3. Just one more reason for me to despise NPR, not that I needed one.

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  4. My county rules on financial disclosure is a big reason I have not volunteered for positions in the county. It is public information.

    ReplyDelete
  5. My county rules on financial disclosure is a big reason I have not volunteered for positions in the county. It is public information.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Members of our ruling class prefers to make their money after they get in office, not before.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Members of our ruling class prefer to make their money after they get in office, not before.

    ReplyDelete