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Monday, April 02, 2018

A tale of two Michael Browns

"Berthinia Rutledge-Brown lost three babies before she gave birth to Michael, so she poured all her energy into helping him with his studies," the Daily Mail reported.

And 17 years later, she left him with a terribly difficult decision: Harvard or Yale or Princeton or Northwestern or Penn or Stanford or Georgetown or Vanderbilt or any one of a dozen other colleges.

All have accepted Michael Brown's applications for college. All have offered him a scholarship.

"After sixth grade, Mike was in control of his education. He was focused, he knew what he wanted and he made his own decisions," his mom told the Daily Mail.

He's a student at Mirabeau B. Lamar High School in Houston, where they have a special academy for excellent students who combine born smarts with hard work to become the best.

Lamar was the second president of the Republic of Texas, who stressed education. However, at 17, he turned down Princeton.

The natural comparison of course is to loudmouth David Hogg, who has ghoulishly capitalized on the rare tragedy at his high school to become a Marxist celebrity. The four University of California schools that he wanted to attend not only refused to give him scholarships but declined his application.

But a more important comparison is to another Michael Brown, the young man in Ferguson, Missouri, whose suicide-by-cop ignited a national nightmare.

Both were big men. Both black. Both teenagers. Both enjoyed all the opportunities our nation offers.

Michael D. Brown chose the thug life. It's the easy way out. Michael Brown of Houston chose hard work, which paid off in an opportunity to work even harder for an even bigger payoff.

To be fair, one had a parent who gave a darn about him.

Which decision did the press and the Marxists turn into a national cause?

14 comments:

  1. "Which decision did the press and the Marxists turn into a national cause?"

    They chose ... badly.
    JimNorCal

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  2. Made one B. Schools flock after him. No mention of SAT or ACT scores. I had a sone like that, only he also kicked butt on the exams. No one sought after him, but he did get a minor scholarship when one school took notice after application.

    Going to major in poli-sci. Maybe econ. Will probably end up a professor with mediocre performance but gets pushed through because of the subjectivity of the coursework and his skin color.

    Sorry to throw cold water on this, Don, but there's nothing special to see here, other than his background. My Dad's was worse. He was one of those little kids you've seen in old pictures picking cotton barefoot in ragged clothes for a dime a bag during the depression. Was dyslexic, but no one recognized it. Graduated high school by being passed on. Nickname in school was "Dope". Left home at 17, moved to another state, sold kitchenware, encyclopedias door to door, put up TV antennae, and put in a stint at Studebaker just before they went bankrupt. While he was there he was bullied by union thugs to work slower. Went to bed every night with a bible and a dictionary and slowly overcame his dyslexia enough to enroll in night school. Became an orderly, EEG technician, and started manufacturing psychological testing apparatus in our garage. Got accepted into med school without a college degree.

    That's a real come from behind win. The one you just made note of was manufactured by a mother and some high school counselors and the big win announced even before the game has really started.

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    Replies
    1. It's the bigotry of low expectations. When skills are marginally more than swiping an EBT card through a scanner they're declared brilliant - and given the Nobel Peace Prize.

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    2. "No mention of SAT or ACT scores."

      One article I read did mention his scores. IIRC, his SAT was 1540 or so (on a 1600 scale). That's quite good, not the 1600 a boy wunderkind would achieve, but certainly good enough to justify the interest in him shown by good schools.

      More curious is the inconsistent spelling of his first name by the media. Some papers spell it Michael, others Micheal, and there's even one article that goes back and forth between the two, spelling it one way and then the other. LOL.

      I usually dismiss media articles about bright high school students, especially whenever they get to mentioning the student's preference for a soft major like poly sci. Do you know who else majored in that? The Obummer. And you know how brilliant (!) an adult he turned out to be.

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    3. Michael is one of those names that should be simple, but 50-50 on someone else spelling it correctly. That's why most of us go by Mike.

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  3. I'm kinda curious about his scores, too.

    Sad that when a black kid gets accepted into one of the elite, ultra-left kingdoms of "educational excellence," it's natural to assume that "affirmative action" played a significant part. Even sadder is that it almost always does.

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    Replies
    1. Many of them would be better off in a lower tier school and end up performing poorly in the elite ones. I suspect that a lot of the grade inflation in the ivies is due to them realizing that they need to pass these kids and in order to do so they make everyone's grades meaningless. The smart thing about this situation is that rather than encouraging the kid to do a STEM major, he was guide into one that has little intellectual rigor and he will be as smart as many of his professors. Heh.

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    2. Because of "affirmative action" I am leery of minority professionals whether they are doctors, lawyers, financial advisors, etc. Not everyone was "affirmative action" but that stigma registers with me because you can't tell by looking which were and which were not and taking advice you might find out too late.

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    3. This is a case of raw affirmative action. With a 1540 a white or asian student would have gotten into one or two of those schools. But when the student is black, then entire education establishment falls into line. This is the real story here.

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  4. Off topic:
    http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/trump_administration/prez_track_apr02
    Rasmussen has President Trump at 50%.
    JimNorCal

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    Replies
    1. Yeah, Jim, I saw that too. If Mr. T decides to bomb this immigrant army coming up from Honduras (with Mexico giving them assistance), that number will pop to at least 55. God damn the country of Mexico.

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  5. I give the young man credit. He faces a lot of peer pressure to be authentic, so good for him.

    No credit to the "Hands up, don't shoot" thug.

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  6. Hogg's little stunt to shame the UC schools into admitting him did nothing other than get Laura Ingraham in trouble and make him look like a bigger douche than we already thought, and that was tough to do.

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  7. Nice to have that 400 point SAT advantage for checking the box in the bag though.

    Take a student with the same qualifications, but the wrong parents, and see if they can get accepted at all of those schools. Or, worse, a student that makes it clear on his applications that he is a devout Christian.

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