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Thursday, March 22, 2018

The McCabe Mutiny

The Federal Bureau of Investigation was a constitutionally suspect proposition from the beginning. Law enforcement is best handled at the local level. But Prohibition brought graft and corruption, followed by violent crime.

Enter the FBI.

But 75 years after Prohibition ended, the FBI is still here -- spying on Americans, trying to frame President Trump, and even investigating Jeff Sessions, who is the boss of the Department of Justice.

"Nearly a year before Attorney General Jeff Sessions fired senior FBI official Andrew McCabe for what Sessions called a 'lack of candor,; McCabe oversaw a federal criminal investigation into whether Sessions lacked candor when testifying before Congress about contacts with Russian operatives," ABC News reported.

Let me translate that from McCabe's spin of false equivalency.

On his own -- answerable to no one -- McCabe investigated his boss.

That is insubordination. McCabe's Mutiny is further proof that the FBI has too much power and its leaders believe it is answerable to no one.

"The Special Counsel's office has informed me that after interviewing the attorney general and conducting additional investigation, the attorney general is not under investigation for false statements or perjury in his confirmation hearing testimony and related written submissions to Congress," attorney Chuck Cooper told ABC News on Wednesday.

McCabe needs to be prosecuted, of course.

But we also need to replace the FBI with an agency that serves local law enforcement.

The FBI should keep (and improve) its background checking operations. It also should help train local officers. It should be a great resource for local (and state) law enforcement.

But the FBI's public corruption operations are an embarrassment.

From Abscam to Raymond Donovan to Marion Barry (the bitch really did set him up) to Ted Stevens (home repairs are bribery?) to Bob Menendez, the U.S. attorney's office and the FBI have repeatedly taken cases to trial that should not have gone beyond a grand jury.

Oh and of course Hillary Clinton, who actually broke the law, got off scot-free because she didn't mean to do it.

We need a federal police force.

Just not this one.

20 comments:

  1. Yes, of course Don. However, the media is working in overdrive to spin this as Sessions deserved to be investigated by McCabe. Politico, ABC News, all bombarding Twitter with the meme that his firing was Session's revenge.

    How do we combat that? So far, they seem to be wining the spin battle.

    (BTW, I was banned from Twitter yet again. Bastards! I'm over at Gab. You should open a Gab acct too).

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    1. The best reply is the truth. It was the FBI that demanded McCabe's firing and for good reason. They FBI's Office of Professional Responsibility noted that McCabe had lied, and lied repeatedly, and under oath. He leaked confidential information to the press. He is a criminal and he will go to prison for his crimes.

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    2. Roger Simon on PJ Media has a piece that has someone's opinion that McCabe was allowed a lawyer during his firing process because he's under indictment already.

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  2. Politics has seeped into the cracks and crevices of so many agencies. I think that process went into hyper-overdrive when the Clinton mafia moved into DC.

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    1. Democrats have always been great at that.

      All the way back to Woody Wilson.

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    2. A near $4 Trillion per year trough will lead to politics creeping into everything! With arguably 25% fraud and abuse, that's a lot of incentive to get and remain political

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  3. I lost all faith in the FBI when they imitially could not identify the Tsarnev brothers who bombed the Boston Marathon and so, released tjeir photos, asking for "help from the public." Found out later they had been warned by Russia and had even already interviewed them!

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    1. It's not that my fingers are too big but rather, my phone is too small. *initially. *their

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  4. The DOJ and FBI are way too cozy. They switch personnel back and forth. Law enforcement and prosecutors are supposed to be entirely separate. It is really VERY illegal that they are so incestuous. Abolishing everything but labs, etc of the FBI (hand it over to the Marshal Service) and the DOJ being forced to work with state and local would stop the plotting. A version of this is what happened in Baltimore with the prosecutor running her own "investigations" on the police which led to the not guilty verdicts. McCabe was running his own "prosecutions" with no supervision (he is not a lawyer but a thug).

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  5. And Sessions is such a pusillanimous wuss rather than be outraged by it and prosecute McCabe he'll actually start to wonder if he lied to Congress and deserved the investigation.

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  6. Wasn't most of the Prohibition stuff (at least the related-to-alcohol parts) handled by Treasury agents? If I remember correctly, Eliot Ness was a T-man, not a G-man. (Also, FBI originally had only Investigative authority. During Prohibition they weren't even allowed to be armed.)

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  7. Too many lawyers at the top of the FBI! The FBI leadership should come from the law enforcement side of the house (real FBI agents).

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  8. "The Special Counsel's office has informed me that after interviewing the attorney general and conducting additional investigation, the attorney general is not under investigation"

    Mueller has no business investigating Sessions for any comments he made during his confirmation hearing. Muller was appointed to look into whether the Russians may have interfered in the 2016 election and whether anyone on Trump's campaign team may have "colluded" with the Russians. Testimony by Sessions at his confirmation hearing, whether any of it related to Sessions alleged contacts with the Russians, is an unrelated and separate matter that the Senate itself has the power to investigate. If they concluded Sessions was untruthful in his testimony, they could ask the House to impeach Sessions. This is not a matter within the purview of Mueller's ever-expanding witch hunt. The next thing you know, Mueller, like a modern day Cotton Mather, will be accusing people of colluding with the Devil and demanding they be tried by having heavy rocks piled on their bodies.

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  9. The ability of the FBI has always been powered by myth. The simple fact is that during the depression they had little impact on the one thing they were created to fight. In the end they didn't get Al Capone for murder, bootlegging, or any other high crimes. They took him to court and he was convicted of tax violations! All those years and dollars. Even the vaunted FBI crime lab was found to be less than their stellar reputation suggested.

    The federal government has a law enforcement division that was in place long before the FBI. The Federal Marshals service are the ones who should be tasked with everything that has been left in the political paws of the FBI. Abolish the FBI, fully fund the Federal Marshals, and let's get just a little bit closer to how the whole thing is supposed to work.

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  10. We have a Federal police force. The U.S. Marshals. FBI should be, as you say and I have said before, reduced to a data collection and forensics agency. Most states now have their own version, anyway.
    BTW, the FBI is not doing a perfect job by any means on data collection nor forensics. But a smaller agency would be easier to fix.
    BTW2, the FBI should be removed from D.C. and dispersed.

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    1. And D.C. itself should be returned to Maryland as the Alexandria part was returned to Virginia.

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  11. I suspect there is more to come out on this particular story. Remember this from March?

    Lewandowski: Obama Bugged Senator Sessions While He Was STILL SENATOR Last Year

    That Fox News story didn't get much further, but this new revelation from ABC suggests there's support for Lewandowski's claim.

    Around the same time Rand Paul complained that the NSA had spied upon he and other members of Congress.

    This thing just keeps getting bigger.

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  12. Make FBI positions a four or five year term. Agents would be nominated by the chief's of police of their respective departments, then attend the FBI academy. At the end of five years, they get turned out and can be snatched up by any departments. 3/4 of agents should be that way. the other 1/4 should be nominated by senators and representatives, again, a five year term.
    After completion of that term, and the expiration of three years, the top 10% would be eligible to return to the FBI to fill supervisory positions for a period of two or three years. Only directors, deputy directors, and the heads of field and regional offices would be selected by the President.
    So, a guy starts out to be a cop. He serves a few years as a patrolman, then advances to sergeant, then detective. Should take about five or six years. He then serves five in the FBI, an elite chip, returns to a city county or other agency. Is possibly called back after three more for three more. He then returns to the local level to complete his career. His retirement is 1/3 paid for by the federal government.

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  13. "constitutionally suspect"

    Blatantly Un-Constitutional, really.

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  14. Not precisely on point but it bears repeating that negligence or other claims that there was no mens rea are specifically EXCLUDED as a defense in crimes of violating classified doc handling. Anyone who has been in the military at ANY level knows this. Every E-3 with a Secret clearance signed a waiver of any such defense and are also on notice that the waiver is not necessary. The law already prohibits the excuses Comey publicly made for Hillary. And yet, here we are.

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