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Wednesday, March 21, 2018

God bless the heroes who restore civilization

Our electricity went out for 59 minutes last night. The lights of the coal-fired electric power plant across the river from Poca kept the town from being completely blacked out.

Brave men went into the cold and rainy night, climbed poles, and connected wires, and the normal returned for everyone.

They are brave. They drive through ice storms in the middle of the night.

They also are dedicated. They drive their trucks to other states to climb poles when floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, and the like knock out power elsewhere. Other states reciprocate.

They are the bad boys of bad weather. Girls too.

Many other heroes and heroines work outdoors when it is better to be indoors. Paramedics, police officers, and tow truck drivers do their part. It is an amazing world of people working against the elements to keep civilization going.

Most of these trades pay well, but one important one does not, at least not in West Virginia. Last night and this morning, Department of Highways road crews pushed snow off the roads that wind through the hills of our beloved state.

Never take for granted these amazing people who leave a warm house to help keep your lights on and your home warm. Pay them well. And when the lights go out, do not curse the darkness, rather pray for the people who will climb poles for you.

In the cold.

In the dark.

22 comments:

  1. Call it what you will, it's an attitude. Can do. Bad weather means you need to make some adjustments. "In doesn't rain in the Army, it rains on the Army." And our first responders and emergency crews are a sort of army - Elric

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  2. And thank God for the can-do spirit that still exists in some places in America, where a major storm means you get out and get some work done. You look around and see people firing up their chainsaws, generators, and other equipment as the loads in the back of trucks pile up as they help their neighbors get back to some semblance of normalcy. No waiting around for Uncle Sam and his checkbook and myriad agencies to come and bail your ass out.

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  3. What a wuss you are Don!

    Our electric was out for 4 MONTHS!

    I live in the very deep south. Puerto Rico.

    We really do appreciate all the hard work utility crews from all over the US have put in. And the billions us taxpayers paid for it.

    50,000 poles and 7,000 miles of wire had to be repljaced.

    About 7% of homes are still without power si ce Maria. Some since Irma 2 weeks before.

    59 minutes? Count your blessings, Don

    John Henry

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  4. If the above sounds snarky I didn't mean it to. Just trying to give some perspective

    John Henry

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    Replies
    1. Sounds like you have lots of Democrats in positions of power and responsibility there.

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    2. We don't actually have any dems or repubs. We have 3 partiez statehood commonwealth and independence. Some pols do secondarily identify with a national party, mostly dems.

      If your point is that our pols are corrupt you win the prize.

      And they've been using the govt owned utility as a piggy bank forever.

      Our pols could give Chicago lessons.

      Still, 50,000 poles broken off or blown over you don't get that level of damage restored overnight.

      Maria passed over my house a high cat 4 or low cat 5. My 4th major hurricane in this house and it scared the crap out of me.

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    3. You got my point.

      You must have a very well-built house (or often re-built house). I trust things are back to normal for you.

      I'm glad you're OK.

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    4. John: you don't get that level of damage restored overnight

      And when it wasn't restored quickly, some on the Left here blamed Trump. A certain Bernie Sanders supporter in my family was one.

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  5. Don't forget the people who never have a snow day.

    Or snow night.

    Nurse and the techs in hospitals that have to man the 12 hour shift regardless of how bad it is.

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    Replies
    1. Dittos. My daughter is an ER nurse and my son-in-law is a corrections officer, both essential jobs.

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  6. I worked for 17 years in highway maintenance Pennsylvania and 15 years in highway maintenance in Florida. When I was being interviewed in Florida, they asked me what I thought was a major difference between the two jobs. I told them "no one calls you at two in the morning to mow the grass." Of course hurricanes were more of a problem in Florida but they were not as frequent as snow storms.

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  7. Thank you all emergency responders. My wife too works many long hard hours at our hospital and even more during an emergency situation such as last years wildfires whereby whole towns were evacuated and their sick and infirm billeted at our hospital.

    She works hard and is tireless and I love her dearly for both her outlook on life and her commitment to her chosen field. She is also just shy of 60.

    SC

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  8. Don - you left out fire fighters.

    I have much respect For the linemen - working with high voltage in horrible conditions.

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  9. My Grandfather was a lineman back in the day. He was working on a main line from our hydroelectric plant when somebody re-energized the line. He didn't die but was never the same man afterward.

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  10. You are missing an important point. I lost power for two days. Get off the internet it is making you crazy. Try going without internet, tv, radio, and news papers for two days and you will see what I mean. Try it this weekend, see what happens.

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  11. We got 16 inches here in Hedgesville, Big D. Didn't lose power. I Was coming back from getting a tooth pulled (suckage) and got stuck about two miles from the house (double suckage) on Tuesday. Hoss is spot on - the kindness and generosity of the people I met were amazing. We got pulled out by a contractor who has a Caterpillar - he's done work for us. Didn't want any money for it but the wife demanded he take a hundie. Happy Spring!

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  12. My father worked for the power company 40 years...he went out in blizzards and hurricanes to restore power--even when was a supervisor. After he retired, he continued to do so for a friend who owned a company that would be contracted in emergencies.

    He never considered himself a hero...just someone doing his job, a job he loved. He has been gone nearly 20 years--and now I am a little glad. My father--veteran of Korea, Purple Heart recipient, lifelong member of the Democratic party, proud union member (president of his local until his promotion into a supervisory/management position)
    --would have nothing to do with folks like you.
    He had no use for plastic flattery, and would have even less for trash like you who think Trump is a hero to the "common man" (at least as long as he's white and adores the ground he walks on). He lived and moved on in whatever time he passed, and had no fantasies about the "good old days" when only people like himself mattered.

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    Replies
    1. I'm sorry you consider me to be fake. Your father's modesty is admirable. Your politicization of his life is amusing.

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  13. That WAS his life...sorry it doesn't fit your good right wing Republican template.

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    Replies
    1. Out of thousands of posts I have here, you chose a rare apolitical one to attack.

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  14. It was political with the opening line about the coal-fired power plant...clearly you think Trump's lovely rocks will keep good Americans warm and lit forever with no ugly side effects (which the "bad" media will claim otherwise).

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