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Wednesday, December 28, 2016

President Trump delivers on jobs promise

8,000 of those 50,000 jobs SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son promised Donald Trump will soon be taking applications.

From CNBC:
Donald Trump said Wednesday that Sprint will bring 5,000 jobs back to the United States from overseas, while he said another company OneWeb will add 3,000 jobs in the U.S.
The president-elect said the deal "was done through" SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son, a Japanese billionaire and technology investor. Earlier this month, the pair announced in New York that SoftBank agreed to invest $50 billion in the U.S. and aimed to create 50,000 jobs.
SoftBank owns about 80 percent of Sprint and has about a 40 percent stake in OneWeb, according to The Wall Street Journal. It is unclear whether the positions announced Wednesday were part of the previously announced agreement.
I think it is pretty clear this is part of the 50,000 Son promised.

Americans must get ready for these jobs, as Newt Gingrich wrote on Tuesday:
President-elect Trump has said that his administration will be focused on three very important words: Jobs, jobs, jobs.
He has outlined a bold agenda to achieve 4 percent economic growth in America, and much of that agenda involves undoing the Obama administration’s disastrous regulations that get in the way of job creation.
But job creation is only half the challenge. Americans must have the skills necessary to do the jobs that are created under this new, more dynamic economy.
Meeting this goal will also require undoing the harmful actions of the Obama administration, specifically the devastating impact his Department of Education is having on career education in America.
Career education is distinct from the four-year Bachelor of Arts and Science programs you might think of as higher education. Career education certificates and associate degrees typically take 1 or 2 years, respectively, and rather than providing a broad-based education, they are specifically tailored to prepare students for specific jobs.
Much of that education comes from for-profit schools.

You see any welding classes at Harvard?

Yale?

West Virginia State College?

@@@

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12 comments:

  1. Trump has done more as a President-elect than Barry has in 8 years.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Private schools like Harvard and Yale can be as elite as they want and offer whatever courses and study programs they wish. That's their prerogative. But public colleges and universities should focus on educating students for careers after graduation and life outside academia. That's their raison d'être. If they don't fulfill that important mission which the public has entrusted to them, taxpayers have no obligation to fund them. Any state school that prefers to do otherwise might as well be private like the Ivy League schools and be forced to make do with whatever funding it can raise from private sources.

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  3. Still waiting for Obama's pivot to the economy.

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  4. It was a big mistake for high schools to abandon wood shop, auto shop, printing and graphic arts, etc. My high school had all these and more in the 70s.

    Everybody needs some practical knowledge and some people are only interested in learning a trade and moving into gainful employment after high school, and the job of public education should be to provide that. Our national obsession with college for everyone just does not reflect reality, and does not meet the meeds of students or society at large. Let's stop doing that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree completely, Jeff. Shit, it's getting so hard to find a competent plumber these days. I'm, uh, not poor, and have the ability to pay top dollar to someone who can come in and fix my freakin toilet! Two have tried and failed thus far...

      Delete
    2. Remember that old dodge where you bet the strapping young apprentice that you can haul something in the wheelbarrow to the other end of the yard that he won't be able to haul back?

      And then as soon as he takes your bet, you pick up the handles of the wheelbarrow and say, "Okay, buddy, get in."

      Delete
  5. Z - no kidding. I've seen several plumbers complain in news stories about how hard it is to find young men who want to go into the business. Maybe the Trump infrastructure projects will get some guys back into the trades - this is a good opportunity to include somebody like Mike Rowe in a position of influence somewhere ... good synergy between jobs, education, and building shit! LOL

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  6. My local HS has a wood shop, and the community college auto shop and welding.

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  7. Sputnik made an American college education necessary over time for almost any job except those "awful" manual jobs. After retirement I and others fought for a tech school expansion in our county. Having quit college and entered the Navy in 1965, I became a reactor operator, electronics tech and electrician abroad subs. I eventually became a site manager for startup and operating services on major power plant projects directing field engineers and those "awful" craft. We would never have constructed those plants without welders, steam fitters, electricians, millwrights and other craft. Welders in ND are earning $140,000 a year and in the Canadian oil field even more. IMO, other than engineering and the sciences, few need 4 year college degrees or more. I believe this because I have encountered too many college educated people who can't fix just about anything nor understand the basis of how modern conveniences operate.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Sputnik made an American college education necessary over time for almost any job except those "awful" manual jobs. After retirement I and others fought for a tech school expansion in our county. Having quit college and entered the Navy in 1965, I became a reactor operator, electronics tech and electrician abroad subs. I eventually became a site manager for startup and operating services on major power plant projects directing field engineers and those "awful" craft. We would never have constructed those plants without welders, steam fitters, electricians, millwrights and other craft. Welders in ND are earning $140,000 a year and in the Canadian oil field even more. IMO, other than engineering and the sciences, few need 4 year college degrees or more. I believe this because I have encountered too many college educated people who can't fix just about anything nor understand the basis of how modern conveniences operate.

    ReplyDelete