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Thursday, December 01, 2016

Mexican side to Carrier story

From WRTV on March 1: "Trump: If I'm president, Carrier won't move to Mexico."

Trump can't save those jobs said all the experts in the media -- who of course know more than a mere billionaire about the ways of finance and business.

Well, Trump saved the plant and no one in the press will admit they were wrong. It's just 1,000 jobs they say.

Close a restaurant in Washington and hear the press moan about five waitresses laid off.

But every story has a loser and Mark Stevenson of the Associated Press duly told Mexico's. One aspect of the story disturbed me:
Monterrey, Santa Catarina and much of Nuevo Leon was gripped four years ago by a wave of drug cartel violence and killings. But the situation has calmed, in part because of greater law enforcement efforts but also because of increased job availabilities at new businesses, such as a new Kia Motors auto plant, that have opened nearby.
Besides renegotiating NAFTA, how about we get serious about the War on Drugs? 

Drugs are destroying our country, and theirs.

I know, that gets me kicked out of the Kool Kidz Libertarian Klub, but really the recreational use of drugs destroys nations and armies. In the 1970s it almost destroyed the American army. The Republican Party was founded on abolition and temperance -- not tolerance for alcoholism. Idleness is the devil's workshop. Time to close it down. I favor a cultural war on drugs.

If we can send people to prison for lying to federal investigators (Scooter Libby, Martha Stewart) then I really have no problem with jailing druglords.

As for losing Carrier, here is an idea for Mexico: abandon the socialism and encourage Mexicans to invent things and manufacture them. 

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10 comments:

  1. Socialism is a killer. See: Venezuela.

    ReplyDelete
  2. A secure border would go a long way toward stopping the drugs entering from Mexico, as well as illegal immigrants. It doesn't even need to be a physical barrier. Station troops at intervals with orders to "shoot to kill." There's no training better than live-fire exercises. - Elric

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  3. I'm far from being a libertarian- but I still wonder why it took a Constitutional Amendment to ban booze, but only a simple law to ban drugs. But then, our elite superiors know better than we do, don't they?

    I also wonder how the Civil Rights Act of 1964- the one that makes everyone equal to everyone else (except white men of course, they don't count)- is Constitutional as well. Didn't we used to have freedom of association? We don't have that any more.

    In California, where I am, we don't have many of the freedoms we once did, back when the Constitution was followed. I miss those freedoms.

    I'd prefer not to have more laws and regulations, regardless of how good they seem to some!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Drugs may have affected the remf's but I doubt many grunts in the field did much. Word is, If you are not a grunt, you are just support. At least that's what is on my tee shirt.

    The war on drugs has been even more of a failure than prohibition. Legal pot is inevidible.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Theodoric of EpistleDecember 1, 2016 at 3:18 PM

    the war on drugs is a war on Liberty.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Liberty without restraint is license. That's bad juju. The art of government is knowing where to draw the lines.

    ReplyDelete
  7. 25 volts of EMF for every ounce someone tries to smuggle into the country.

    Once they start getting into pounds, we're talking extra crispy.

    ReplyDelete
  8. All now drugs were legal until 1913, when they started to be made illegal. They were made illegal because they were destroying the American society. In 1911 the United States first Opium Commissioner, Hamilton Wright, argued that of all the nations of the world, the United States consumed most habit-forming drugs per capital. No lessons learned, apparently

    ReplyDelete
  9. All now drugs were legal until 1913, when they started to be made illegal. They were made illegal because they were destroying the American society. In 1911 the United States first Opium Commissioner, Hamilton Wright, argued that of all the nations of the world, the United States consumed most habit-forming drugs per capital. No lessons learned, apparently

    ReplyDelete