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Sunday, August 28, 2016

The truly poor cannot afford cigarettes

The headline in the Hill was intriguing:
Smoking ban for public housing sparks backlash
If public housing is for the poor, then how can they afford $5 to $10 a pack in big cities to smoke?

From the Hill:
Homeless advocates and public health officials are squaring off over a controversial Obama administration proposal to ban smoking in government-assisted housing projects.
The smoking ban has drawn praise from health officials who say it would spare non-smokers from the dangerous effects of secondhand smoke. But homeless advocates are enraged by the proposal, which they fear could force low-income residents who can’t kick the habit out of their homes.
“We are extremely concerned that this rule will create additional homelessness,” said John Lozier, executive director of the National Health Care for the Homeless Council.
“Our primary concern about this policy is the fate of those who are unable to quit smoking and are evicted for this lease violation,” he added. “Evictions create homelessness."
The Department of Housing and Urban Development, which declined to comment, sent the rule to the White House's Office of Management and Budget earlier this week for approval.
The smoking ban would apply to lit cigarettes, cigars and pipes. Residents would be prohibited from smoking not only in their homes but also in hallways, on balconies and porches and anywhere else within 25 feet of the apartment building.
I smoked a pack a day for 18 years and then quit 29 years ago. I was stupid. I ignored the Surgeon General report in 1964 and four or five years later took up smoke

No one under 70 should smoke because we were warned.

And if you can afford smokes, you can afford rent.

15 comments:

  1. Oh, nooooooooooooooooes! They left out Vapes!!!!!

    As to how do they afford cigs, one way:
    The last scene of I Am A Fugitive From A Chain Gang, someone asks Paul Muni how he gets along. From out of the darkness comes, "I steal."

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  2. I have long thought that the main reason for the antismoking legislation had nothing to do with health but more to do with having a dry run for future hours of controlling ever more of people's lives and transforming the culture.

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  3. Does anyone really believe this is enforceable?

    Affordable housing complex managers will now have even more leverage for dispensing favoritism to those who are willing to 'pay to smoke'.
    These people are already living in the mosh pit of life where the law of the strongest applies and no am't of piss ant legislation is going to make this socialist wet dream enforceable.

    And besides, who is going to complain...if they expect their life there not to be made a living hell.

    Sam C

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 'And besides, who is going to complain...if they expect their life there not to be made a living hell.'

      I'm referring here to tenants sharing the same complex.
      SC

      Delete
  4. These days, nearly all restaurants, public buildings, and even many open air public facilities (including public transportation) have no-smoking rules, so why not public housing?

    In homes they own, people should have a right to smoke as long as cigarettes, cigars, and pipes are legal to sell. I'm a life-long non-smoker, but I value the right of people to be free of an over-reaching government in their own homes, even if smoking may not be a healthy choice to make. I regard the medical argument against second-hand smoke, which is the basis for many local no-smoking regulations, to be mostly bogus, although I greatly appreciate clean air that's free of someone else's cigarette or cigar smoke. But a preference for clean air is not the same as claiming that casual exposure to second hand smoke is deadly.

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  5. Another regulation to ignore. How would you enforce it?

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  6. Cigarettes don't cost $5 to $10. The taxes cost $5 to $10. But I get your larger point. However, several thousand violent felons are living in public housing against the law. Deal with them first.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Cigarettes don't cost $5 to $10. The taxes cost $5 to $10. But I get your larger point. However, several thousand violent felons are living in public housing against the law. Deal with them first.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Isn't it amazing how poor people can afford cigarettes and lottery tickets? I call them taxes on the stupid. In Georgia the lottery funds college education for middle class students so poor people pay for college for the middle class. Love it!

    I smoked a pack and a half a day of Pall Mall cigarettes. Quit cold turkey 42 years ago.

    Has Obungler quit smoking? He lives in a gummint run housing project?

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  9. I have a four pack on 1968 C-ration Pall Malls if you want a "quick" smoke.

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  10. My grandfather used to pose the question "How do you smoke in the wind and the rain?"

    To which his answer was "Get out of the (gerund) wind and rain, (compound noun)!"

    ReplyDelete
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    ReplyDelete
  12. They trade SNAP benefits for cigarettes then head for the church food pantries to feed the kids. - Elric

    ReplyDelete