Please purchase "Trump the Press" through Create Space.

The book is on Kindle. Order here.

Sunday, July 31, 2016

The party of Goldman Sachs and Planned Parenthood

The leaked DNC emails show political insiders gleefully greased the skids Hillary Clinton's nomination at the pols. But the pols had her covered if Sanders somehow had beat her in actual voting.

The party set aside 712 superdelegates, who ultimately would decide the nomination if the rank-and-file tried to nominate the wrong person. Almost one in ten of these superdelegates were lobbyists for such groups as Goldman Sachs and Planned Parenthood.

From the Washington Examiner:
At least 63 of 712 superdelegates were registered at some point as lobbyists on the state or federal level, according to an analysis conducted this year by the nonpartisan, nonprofit Sunlight Foundation.
These individuals represented interests that span across big banks, healthcare insurers, the telecommunications industry and unions, including Goldman Sachs and Planned Parenthood.
The list includes former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, who is currently registered for the healthcare insurance company Aetna, former House Minority Leader Richard Gephardt, a registered lobbyist with the Gephardt Group and former DNC General Chairman and Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, who was registered for Ballard Spahr LLP as recently as 2012.
Sunlight also found an additional 32 individuals it classified as "shadow lobbyists," which it says are superdelegates who "aren't officially registered as lobbyists, but are heavily involved in the influence industry."
This group includes the likes of former Vermont Gov. and DNC Chairman Howard Dean, who is a "senior adviser" for Dentons, a law firm.
Goldman Sachs invests in people -- powerful people -- politicians in both parties.

This is not new. This is how political parties used to run, by men in smoke-filled backrooms deciding the fate of the nation. We became enlightened in the 1970s and switched to primaries and caucuses. Now dark forces on both sides -- Hillary and Ted Cruz in particular (remember Colorado) -- wish to return to that.

Besides being untrustworthy lawyers, what else do Hillary and Cruz share in common? Goldman Sachs. His wife works for them. What did I say earlier?

Trump may be our last hope. I wish there were someone better. But if he loses, the nefarious forces who now back Hillary will sweep back in and demand Republicans bring back the superdelegates. That's the whole game behind Never Trump.

I mean the organized Never Trump movement, not individuals who cannot stand the man.

***
The Kindle version of "Trump the Press: Don Surber's take on how the pundits blew the 2016 Republican race" finally is available. Please order here.

The paperback edition is available here.

Autographed copies are available for $20 (includes shipping). Email me at DonSurber@GMail.com

14 comments:

  1. "I wish there could be someone better". Besides someone like Jeff Sessions, who could possibly fit the bill? And given that the ideas that we need right now will not be backed by any elites or any big media, where would they get their money? The way I look at it now, Trump is the perfect fit right now. Our right wing Seabiscuit.

    ReplyDelete
  2. As Scott Adams (Dilbert.com) has pointed out, there is really no way for a politician to be "Qualified" to be President - there is no way to train for the job!

    The usual candidates - Governors and Senators - are not experienced with the likes of Putin: no one but a President is.

    We have a unique opportunity in Donald Trump, a CEO who comes as close to the qualifications as ANYONE. He's dealt with hostile entities foreign and domestic all his life, has learned how to pick advisors who know the details, and to listen to them.

    This is a very rare opportunity, when the right man has come forward when he is absolutely needed - I really doubt that there is "someone better" out there at this time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Democrats tout Hillary Clinton's "experience" versus Donald Trump's "inexperience," conveniently forgetting, of course, Barack Obama's total lack of experience when he was first elected. Be that as it may, is "experience" a pre-requisite for being a good president? I think experience, certainly experience of the wrong kind, is over-rated to qualify someone for the job. A more crucial skill is the ability to make decisions in situations where critical information is incomplete. Every president faces situations where he has to react and work with less than full or perfect information. The mark of a good leader is whether he can reach an "optimal" decision in an environment filled with confusion and uncertainty.

      Does Hillary Clinton have that ability? Her past performance in government demonstrates to me that she does not, that she consistently shows poor judgement when faced with making difficult decisions. Now Donald Trump, on the other hand, despite his many personal faults, has faced situations of this nature many times in business. If the success of his business empire is any gauge, Trump has a talent for reaching "optimal" decisions in the face of considerable uncertainty. This skill, I think, is far more important than "experience" in office. Experience, even of the good kind, not the Hillary Clinton bad kind, is something a president can get from his staff of advisers. The skill for making decisions is something a president cannot hire. He's either got it, or he doesn't. In business, at least, Trump has shown he has it, Hillary has shown she doesn't. Judgement trumps experience.

      Delete
    2. Excellent comment, with which I totally agree.

      Delete
    3. "Her past performance in government demonstrates to me that she does not, that she consistently shows poor judgement when faced with making difficult decisions."
      Not to mention, ones that would be easy for us, and should be for her, were here mind not so convoluted and devious.

      Delete
    4. George Shultz, President of Bechtel Corp, found out that he had more power to get things done when he was in private industry than when he was SoS. He said as SoS he was ignored at times and he could not do anything about it. "You're fired" doesn't work with the bureaucracy. So I worry that Trump will go the route of executive orders as has Obama to put his stamp on government and bypass government bureaucracy with his own team like Nixon did.

      Delete
    5. George Shultz, President of Bechtel Corp, found out that he had more power to get things done when he was in private industry than when he was SoS. He said as SoS he was ignored at times and he could not do anything about it. "You're fired" doesn't work with the bureaucracy. So I worry that Trump will go the route of executive orders as has Obama to put his stamp on government and bypass government bureaucracy with his own team like Nixon did.

      Delete
  3. Gilded Age II.

    This is the way it was about 130 years ago. If history is any guide, the people do get fed up and demand good government, but it takes a while. And I'm sure there were plenty who wished there were someone better than Teddy Roosevelt in them thar days, too.

    The Rs don't need superdelegates when state party chairs and county commissioners are for sale, as was the case not only in CO, but ND, WY, and several other places. The flip side is the superdelegates came in during the '84 election. They are the ones who gave us Walter Mondale.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Ted Cruz followed Colorado rules for the caucus. Donald Trump lied about it.

    Remember that Trump tells multiple lies every day - but that is somehow OK with folks who are making a living on the Trump name.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Someone better? Methinks Mr. Trump is plenty good enough for these times. He is a needed oversized bull with palsy in a tiny china shop of political correctness...

    ReplyDelete
  6. GOP had superdelegates? News to me.

    ReplyDelete
  7. OT: as I was going through Instapundit I saw that at PJ Media someone named Christian Toto was getting his britches in a twist because the Left wing was trying to get comedians to mock Trump.

    Stop.

    Got to think.

    Nope, no Republican candidate ever faced that before. Why did we not see that threat to our comedic flank! Trump is obviously doomed. Doomed I tell you!

    because no Republican candidate ever has faced the awesome power of Left-Wing Comedic Mockery!

    Waaaaaahhhhhh!

    /sarc

    -Mikey NTH

    ReplyDelete
  8. Someone "better" wouldn't be punching the lying media hacks in the mouth with the regularity and consistency that Trump had & does.
    So be careful what you wish for -- the "better" someone would lose graciously and hand the White House -- and by extension -- the Supreme Court to Hillary

    ReplyDelete
  9. Trump is exactly the type of candidate and person needed to take down the evil hildabeast and establishment. I hve not heard anyone identify a candidate who in my mind would be superior to Donald Trump. All the talk about a better candidate is nonsense. Like who? Give me some specifics. Jeb? Ted Cruz? Marco? These guys all suck and would roll with the leftist establishment big immigration outsourcing agenda. Trump is the only candidate who demonstrated a true understanding of the nation's big problems (immigration) and had the guts to state it and defend it.

    ReplyDelete