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Friday, April 29, 2016

Retire early, die early?

Mom retired at 62. That was nearly 30 years ago. She just turned 92.

But hey, "science" tells us if you retire at 62 you are going to die sooner.

From the Daily Mail:
Most people count down the days to retirement, but a recent study has found it could actually send you to an early grave.
New findings suggest that working past age 65 could actually add more years onto your life.
It was found to lead to an 11 percent lower risk of death from all causes.
The study found that even those who termed themselves unhealthy are also likely to live longer, just as long as they kept punching the clock.
'It may not apply to everybody, but we think work brings people a lot of economic and social benefits that could impact the length of their lives,' said Chenkai Wu, the lead author of the study and doctoral student at Oregon State University.
Given the health issues my mother and other people in their 90s often suffer, a long life may be overrated.

I was able to retire at 62. I have no regrets -- so far.

12 comments:

  1. It may depend on what "retire" means to you.

    Since I retired at 61, I've traveled a bit: seen more of Australia by camper-van than most Australians have seen (so they tell me), been to Hawaii, Tahiti, Pitcairn Island, Easter Island, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Antarctica, Europe several times, the UK, sailed the Intra Coastal Waterway twice, Camped across America several times and continued exploring the US Southwest.

    All that with type 2 diabetes.

    If you just sit home and watch TV, your body may well atrophy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I retired at age 62, with Type 2 diabetes as well. I've never felt healthier than I do right now.

      I have time to do all the things there was never time for while I held down my job. No more stress.

      I visit with friends, exercise, blog, travel, read, work in my garden and do volunteer work in my community.

      Retirement should be seen as the beginning of life not it's twilight.

      Delete
  2. It may depend on what "retire" means to you.

    Since I retired at 61, I've traveled a bit: seen more of Australia by camper-van than most Australians have seen (so they tell me), been to Hawaii, Tahiti, Pitcairn Island, Easter Island, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Antarctica, Europe several times, the UK, sailed the Intra Coastal Waterway twice, Camped across America several times and continued exploring the US Southwest.

    All that with type 2 diabetes.

    If you just sit home and watch TV, your body may well atrophy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are quite the traveler. Congratulations. When I was working, my job afforded me the opportunity to travel to some really unusual places, but since I've retired, my wife and I make it a point to take one big trip each year. We've managed to visit more than 60 different countries. A year and a half ago, we landed at Pitcairn (they make great honey, please buy some on-line) and then continued on to Rapa Nui (surprisingly good beer there). Later this year we are off to Indonesia and then the Great Barrier Reef for some snorkeling and underwater photography. We'll come back with 10 thousand pictures and videos, at least, then spend 3 months or so fixing them up to show friends and family. Let me tell you, keeping that busy in old age is damn hard work, but somebody has got to do it.

      Delete
  3. Just lost a dear friend at 78. She was an RN, had just retired the week earlier to stay home and babysit the great-granddaughter. Freak accident, though, not health related. I don't think generalizations are good indicators for anything. We are so different, the best indicator is DNA. Grandpa made it to 98, most of the kids that did not smoke made it to mid-90s. Smokers died in their sixties. Cancer, all four. Great grandma was 101. I suspect you can't kill us with a big stick, but a little one will do the trick.

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  4. My dad is 82 and works every day. - Elric

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That may depend on what "work" means to you.

      I maintained & repaired big Xerox printers for 33 years - mostly at night.

      I got tired of dirty hands, kneeling on concrete floors and having to be someplace I didn't really want to be - every day.

      When one has accumulated sufficient funds to live on, I consider "work" a waste of life.

      The nearest I've come to "work" since retiring is pouring wine for various California wineries, at events - that's the sort of "work" I don't consider a waste of life.

      Delete
  5. You need to keep going at something, keep your mind active.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I read Trump is nuts, Hillary's a crook, and Bern's a socialist stories. Can't tell you how active that keeps my mind.

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  7. I would guess that, in general, people retire at 62 because their health makes working intolerable or just difficult. In other words, the shortened lifespan is probably mostly not caused by early retirement.

    I retired at age 43 simply because I could. Just remaining active physically and mentally is the real key to holding onto your health.

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  8. I retired at 67 because the owner of the business done sol' de plantation up de ribber and let us workers all go.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I retired 13 years ago at 58. No regrets. Loved my work but hated my job due to a bad manager.

    ReplyDelete