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Thursday, February 04, 2016

We blew the moon




Americans are rightly proud of putting the first man on the moon. This is a national achievement kicked off by Ike Eisenhower in the 1950s, although history generally credits Jack Kennedy.

But on December 14, 1972, the Eugene Cernan left the moon, becoming the last man on the moon (on February 26, they will release a documentary on him and his mission called, "The Last Man On The Moon"). That is a national disgrace. Instead of exploring the moon further and using the moon as a springboard deeper into space, America turned her back on science and progress, saying it should fix the problems on Earth first. What a load of bunk. It is navel-gazing. We blew trillions on knot-headed programs such as Title I (and all twelve of the federal education programs) that failed to improve education, because you cannot teach a kid who does not want to learn. We are now $19 trillion in the hole and not on social problem seems to have been fixed. The poverty rate is the same. And the anger and hatred and frustration among ghetto blacks remains unchanged.

We built a lead in space and technology and frittered it away. For the last 43 years we have screwed around like the Hare in the Aesop fable. Now China has a lunar module and the Russians plan to land a man there.

The crazy thing is we kept spending money on science -- but it was Government Science. In the 43 years since the United States abandoned the moon, we have chased the pseudo-science of climate change for the express purpose of promoting socialism and the takeover of private industry. The money NASA blew on this fraud could have been spent colonizing the moon.

And the moon is important. We can see it. It may just be a cloud of dirt that reflects the sun, but it is our moon. An awesome American colony would have told the world who is in charge. I do not want America to be the world's policeman; I want America to be the world's king. Someone will be. Might a well be us.

I look at the moon now without pride but with shame. I was 15 when we put the first man on the moon, 19 when we abandoned her. Now I am 62 and ashamed. We had an awesome lead and we blew it for a bowl of soup and a crust of bread.

15 comments:

  1. Right On. How absolutely true. I am 69 and remember the early days of space flight. I know the Space Station is important, but a base on the Moon would have been so much better.

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  2. So which presidential candidate is calling for a return to the moon? The money wasted on Iraq alone under the pretense of being the world's policemen could have accomplished your goal. If going to the moon is so important, why haven't other countries done so?

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    1. You must have skipped this para:
      "
      We built a lead in space and technology and frittered it away. For the last 43 years we have screwed around like the Hare in the Aesop fable. Now China has a lunar module and the Russians plan to land a man there." Didn't have the tech or the money is my guess.

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    2. The former Soviet Union had the tech and money years before its break up. Why a bankrupt Russia is considering is probably due to Putin's ego. No doubt Japan and Germany has had the tech and money - at least both for the former.
      Considering how traveling to the moon has been - and is - such a non-topic, I wonder if Trump is writing Don's posts today. Nothing but whining.

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  3. And we put men on the moon (and returned them safely to Earth) with slide rules. Imagine what we could do with our current technology. Yes, I remember those days, and yes, I used a slide rule in school B.C. (Before Calculators). - Elric

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  4. Can't walk on a cloud, Don. Your flying fingers added a "u" to "clod".

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  5. this is a good post. For only one of the 10 trillion in debt Obama hung around the necks of his enemy's children we could have colonized Mars and the moon. However this would have had to have been planned 40 years ago and funded without review as a real priority for the nation. This in turn would have required not only undaunted leadership from every president since Nixon but an unbroken will of the people to succeed no matter the cost in lives or money. Given the huge changes in the US during that time, the wars, the economic swings, the overcoming of the Soviet Union, our rival, the demographic changes, the increasing political polarization, the political lust for spending without restraint to buy votes, the dispart personalities of the presidents we have had, such an unbroken commitment never happened and perhaps was impossible. I am no Democrat but if JFK had lived into a second term and Vietnam had never happened such a commitment might well have been made. A fantasy I know, but his unique charisma and the feverish acceptance he received from his political allies and the young might have made such an idea as space travel considered a moral necessity for our future .

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    1. "...unbroken will of the people ...."

      American people have been broken to the leash under the PC lash.

      We have become men without chests largely.

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  6. You mentioned education. Go back further. In the 18th century public education was going to save the world. Look at it now, and remember that every step since then has only compounded our problems.

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  7. I was flipping channels the other day and stumbled on Opie's Apollo 13 movie. I found myself overcome by emotion at the scene of the Saturn V launch. I mean, seriously overcome. Finally figured out that it was my childhood. One character was holding a model of a LEM. I had a model of the LEM. I was 7 when Sheppard went into space, 13 when Borman recited Genesis from the moon and humans saw the first Earthrise, and 14 when the Eagle landed. I was a space nerd. I got a degree in Aerospace Engineering. I grew up knowing that in my lifetime it would be possible for lay people to go to the moon.

    Boy, was I wrong.

    I apologized to my children for the cinder of a country they will inherit. The only thing progressive about "Progressivism" is the name. Otherwise it is the worst pestilence ever to befall humanity. It destroys everything it touches.

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  8. "And some things that should not have been forgotten were lost. History became legend. Legend became myth."

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  9. I dont apologize to my children- I teach them to get ready to focus, and fight. There will be blood, and they will be survivors.

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  10. Hey, we're the same age. I agree it was a wholly avoidable tragedy. I laugh (with a tear in my eye) when I read about NASA's plans for a manned mission to Mars. We ain't never getting to Mars - at least not the United States in its current incarnation. For many reasons: First, the looming entitlement crises (SS, medicare, government pensions, etc) will leave little left for much else. Second, the people have decided that forced wealth redistribution (down to the dependent classes and up to the crony classes) is our most important national endeavor. Thirdly, real science education is held in disdain by most young people - as opposed to pseudo sciences like "climate change". Next, our greatest scientific minds are busy on fruitless endeavors like trying to figure out what happened .001 seconds after the Big Bang. Not to mention that the Muslim and Third World populations displacing us have zero interest is such things.

    But mainly, as a society we have lost the will, the talent, the abilities for grand endeavors. And they don't come much grander than a manned mission to Mars.

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  11. Yeah, let's borrow more money and run up the national debt more to reap what benefits exactly?

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