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Friday, February 19, 2016

Republicans get it done in West Virginia

After 82 years of Democratic Party control of the West Virginia Legislature, thee state's economy was dead. Actually, it had died 50 years earlier. Most of the steel mills, chemical factories and aluminum plants were shuttered. The post-coal economy died before coal did. West Virginia was last in the nation in just about every economic category. More than half the adults in the state had no job.


In November 2014, West Virginians finally elected a Republican Legislature.

Now as their second regular 60-day session ends, Republicans kept their promise.

Republicans overrode Democratic Governor Earl Ray Tomblin's veto to pass a 20-week limit on abortion. No more killing viable babies in the womb.

Republicans overrode Democratic Governor Earl Ray Tomblin's veto to pass a Right To Work law, which takes effect July 1. West Virginia will be the 26th Right To Work state.

Republicans overrode Democratic Governor Earl Ray Tomblin's veto to end the prevailing wage law that overpaid workers on government projects.

Republicans passed a Religious Freedom Restoration Act. If Democratic Governor Earl Ray Tomblin vetoes it, Republicans will override again.

Republicans are closing in on passage of a concealed gun law that ends the $100 permit fee paid to sheriffs in the state. Vermont never required a permit. It has the nation's lowest gun homicide rate. Democratic Governor Earl Ray Tomblin likely will veto it. Republicans hopefully will have time to override him.

Meanwhile, the first Republican elected state attorney general since 1928, Patrick Morrisey won a stay in the U.S. Supreme Court of Barack Obama's plan to finally kill the coal industry.

Last year, Republicans passed sweeping legal reforms which should reduce car insurance premiums. Republicans also made judicial elections nonpartisan.

They also had to battle the Democratic Secretary of State -- again -- to keep a state Senate seat. Once again, they hauled her into the state Supreme Court and once again the justices (three Democrats and two Republicans) said she acted in violation of the state constitution.

Things are going so well in West Virginia that I only wish this was done 10 years ago.

Compare and contrast to the Republican Congress.

16 comments:

  1. Our Republican Congress could indeed take some pointers from our Legislature, including a balanced budget. As for our esteemed Governor, maybe he could take some time off and get a round or two of golf in with our President. - Elric

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    1. Elric - obviously you are unaware that W.Va. is currently staring at a $350 million budget deficit at the moment and the Rs have showed no plan to balance it, per the state constitution, much less how they will address the expected $400 million deficit predicted for next year. But don't worry, thanks to the Rs, anyone over 21 can carry a gun without a permit (which also means without required safety training).

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    2. They can do what we did in in my home state and sell a toll road to a private company. Boom. Deficit gone. Surpluses ever since. Need a Republican governor, though.

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    3. Doc, and the lefties are still bitching that we "sold" a road, but they sure salivate at the thought of all that surplus we have (we did a white paper for the Governor when I was in grad school on this deal; what the democrats conveniently forget, or never knew, was that Indiana was losing approximately $13 Million a year on that road between maintenance costs and the democrats unwillingness to raise tolls to cover costs...tolls hadn't been raised since 1973).

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  2. Don, while all of your entries are interesting, some are more interesting to me than others. I don't care for the new format where you only show the headline and we must then click to see the article. I would prefer to at least see the first paragraph before the 'read more' link so I can get a sense of whether or not the article is of interest to me. I know! It's hard to believe that anything you write might not be interesting to me, but some things just aren't.

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    1. Thank you for the feedback. I'll try it your way and see if I like it.

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    2. Ah...life in the Information Age. The trials and tribulations.

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  3. You are correct, Don. Most states that have GOP leadership have done better.

    Why then are you so enamored with a northeast liberal pretender like The Donald?

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    1. Get R Done. He promised to kick out the illegals, fix taxes and dump Obamacare.

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    2. Promise of a con man is worth??????

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  4. Isn't it strange that a certain GOP governor in a purple state shut down Obama rail expansion, conquered the teachers union, got Right-to-Work passed and I think he also had a Common Construction Law wage rescinded. Then he stood tall in two recall elections. But the powers that be in the GOP with the help of the media got Scott Walker out of the presidential primary in a hurry.

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  5. Isn't it strange that a certain GOP governor in a purple state shut down Obama rail expansion, conquered the teachers union, got Right-to-Work passed and I think he also had a Common Construction Law wage rescinded. Then he stood tall in two recall elections. But the powers that be in the GOP with the help of the media got Scott Walker out of the presidential primary in a hurry.

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    1. The powers that be did not do that. Walker damaged his campaign by equivocating on immigration matters. He equivocated arguably because he did not have strong views on the subject and one of his billionaire backers wanted a menu of issues neglected. Mickey Kaus put it thus: "billionaire donor Stanley S Hubbard, heckuva job!" It's quite imaginative to suggest that Hubbard was bankrolling Walker's campaign in order to ruin it.

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  6. Why is it that there are so many Republican superstars on the state and local levels and then they go to Washington and lose their mojo?

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  7. Don, you had me feeling pretty good until that last sentence.

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  8. "The post-coal economy died before coal did. West Virginia was last in the nation in just about every economic category. More than half thee adults in the state had no job."

    Just to point out that the ratio of employed persons to the total population is 0.407 in West Virginia; it is 0.444 nationally. The state is and long has been somewhat depressed economically, but its condition is not catastrophic.

    Personal income per capita is in West Virginia about 22% below national means, or on a par with a European country like Belgium. A certain portion of that is attributable to the state's small town and rural character and distance from major cities, something it shares with a number of states with depressed income levels (e.g. Kentucky, Mississippi, Montana, &c).

    As for the state's industrial mix, the share of value-added which is accounted for by agricaulture is about the national mean. That for manufacturing (10%) is below the national mean of 14%. That for extractive industry (15%) is well above the national mean of 3%. It remains an economy wherein extractive industry is important.

    Employment-to-population ratios nationally are lower than they have been in recent decades but not at all unprecedented.



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