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Wednesday, September 09, 2015

Republicans don't care if you are gay, but boy will gays get on you for being Republican



One year ago, James Richardson, a former spokesman and adviser for the Republican National Committee and Governors Haley Barbour and Jon Huntsman, came out of the closet as gay. He wrote a piece in the Washington Post about leaving the closet. He became a media star as CNN and other liberal outlets touted the Gay Republican, but when conservatives shrugged their shoulders, the story went away.

Gays however were outraged. You cannot be gay and a Republican.


A year later, James Richardson wrote:
he morning was September 4, 2014 and the story whose publication I had just approved disclosed publicly for the first time that I am gay. A gay Republican operative, long-partnered, and I wanted my party finally to embrace my desire to wed the person of my choosing. It was a question over which I had anguished for some time  —  was it merely enough to be honest with friends and family, or must I, as a consequence of my career, shoulder a heavier burden to live authentically?
Ultimately and grudgingly, I accepted that I owned a heavier responsibility: pollsters have isolated the opinion-shaping power of coming out as one of the most significant catalysts to positive shifts in American attitudes of LGBTQ persons.
Actually, he was under no such obligation, for the LGBTQ crowd resented his help. They want an enemy. They want a boogie man to blame for their woes. They want opposition from someone they feel is inferior so they can feel superior.

"Lord of the Flies" explains lefty politics better than anything else.

The reactions (LANGUAGE WARNING) online were interesting:
“Fuck this dude. Fuck anyone who works for the enemy for years, then wants to latch onto some of the hard-fought rights we won while fighting people like them and their bosses.”
“He should be embarrassed to be a Republican. He must have a strong internalized sense of homophobia and self-loathing.”
“I despise people like him…”
“Thanks for nothing you worthless quisling. Go crawl back under your rock."
“He made his bed, let him burn in it. How for years he supports GOP thugs and soulless sociopaths! Now he wants to gets married..”
The enemy! The gay rights movement -- which like black civil rights continues long after acceptance does -- is merely a tool in the warchest of the socialist movement.

Republicans? Well, the incidence is a reminder that Dick Cheney supported gay marriage before Democrats did.

Richardson wrote:
I was receiving support from the unlikeliest of sources: senior Republicans.
Elected officials, party elders, and operatives today running the top GOP presidential campaigns all offered words of encouragement and congratulations. “Hang in there,” they told me, “you did the right thing.”
When the dust had settled, my career remained intact. No clients had decamped, no friends had bailed. And I was more confident than ever that it was possible to be both gay and Republican.
Why he thought that senior Republicans are less supportive than young Democrats is beyond me. We've seen life. We've known gay people. These who think it is a sin hate the sin, but love the sinner. At 62,  realize the biggest mistakes in my life seem to come when I stop treating people as individuals.

This was a good lesson for him. Look who hung with him, look who dumped on him.

4 comments:

  1. No group in America nurtures such hatred and meanness like the Left.

    ReplyDelete
  2. “Every great cause begins as a movement, becomes a business, and eventually degenerates into a racket.”

    Eric Hoffer

    ReplyDelete
  3. APOSTATE! Unclean! UNCLEAN! Anyone not exactly like us must be abandoned! Out the window TOSSED! Never to be mentioned again.

    ReplyDelete
  4. "These who think it is a sin hate the sin, but love the sinner."

    Sin? What's that?

    ReplyDelete