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Sunday, May 10, 2015

Strip New England of its ring

The NFL which suspended Josh Gordon for one year for smoking pot -- and illegally banned Adrian Petersen for disciplining his son -- is thinking about perhaps suspending Tom Brady for maybe 6 games for cheating his way to the Super Bowl.

The message is clear: Be politically correct but win at all costs.

Forfeit all of New England's games for 2014 and the playoffs, make it ineligible for the playoffs for two years, suspend Tom Brady and any staff members who helped him for one season (366 days as next year is a leap year), ban Bill Belichick for life from any participation in the NFL and fine the team $100 million.

In short, go full-throttle NCAA on them.

Under Belichick, the team has been a serial cheating team that the NFL has enabled because it wants high ratings in the Boston market.

This is a team whose owner may have committed perjury in defending a player who murdered two men.

The Seattle Seahawks are the repeat champions as far as I am concerned and (gulp) the Baltimore Ravens are the reigning AFC champions. Also, recognize the Buffalo Bills as AFC East champion for 2014.

In fact, the NFL should not allow New England to draft next season.

The sad thing is this hurts Boston fans. As a Browns fan, I say at least you would still have a team.

(Petersen used a switch on his son. Not a twig or a branch, as some media outlets reported. I wouldn't use a switch, but it is not child abuse.)

12 comments:

  1. Is this post click bait? OK, I'll bite.

    Take a deep, deep breath, Don, and then go read the report. You have read it in its entirety, including the scientific analysis in the appendix, haven't you? Then answer these questions: 1) What evidence is there to support the claim that Brady was complicit in, or even knew the footballs were deflated below the allowable range of pressure? As the team's center and other QBs have publicly said, it's not easy at all to know just by feel that a ball is one pound or a pound and a half below the 12.5 psi lower limit specified in the rulebook. The center claimed he did not notice anything wrong with the footballs used in the first half of the AFL game, i.e., they didn't seem exceptionally squishy. Did he lie, too? 2) What evidence do you have that the game official correctly set each Patriots football to the proper pressure before they were taken away by the ball boy? Did the game official record the pressure of each ball he measured and certified? Did he do his job properly? If he screwed up, that would be mighty embarrassing for the League. It's something they'd really want to hide. 3) Is it physically possible for the ball boy to have deflated a dozen balls in just 90 seconds during the short time he spent in the men's room on the way to the playing field? That's less than 8 seconds per ball, each of which had to be taken out of the bag, deflated, and then hurriedly placed back in the ball bag. Maybe he could have worked that fast, maybe not. I'm just asking.

    There appears to be a lot of unsubstantiated innuendo in the report, especially about Brady's involvement. Maybe he cheated, maybe not, but one thing's for sure: in the second half of the AFL game he and the Patriots beat the crap out of the Colts with balls that were supposedly inflated to the proper pressure. And he won against Seattle fair and square in the Superbowl.

    I don't know whether Brady was involved in a sinister "plot" to cheat but I don't accept the rantings of a lot of Tom-haters either. As for Coach Belichick, the report did exonerate him. Or did you not notice that? The League's problem is that if they suspend Brady for a large part of the season, he will appeal to overturn his suspension---and will win. Brady's problem is that team owner Bob Kraft has already said the Patriots will accept whatever punishment the NFL hands down against the club. Since Brady respects Kraft, he probably feels an obligation to agree to whatever punishment he receives from the League---as long as it is reasonable. If he's suspended without pay for longer than 4 games, I believe he will appeal.

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    1. Are you suggesting a professional quarterback with years in the league does not know the difference between a properly inflated football and an under inflated ball? What other delusions do you hold?

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    2. I'm only trying to paraphrase correctly what Scott Zolak, who was Drew Bledsoe's backup for 5 years on the Patriots, said in a recent press interview. Of equal if not more importance to the QB than the exact pressure of the ball (which can change by up to a pound during the course of a game in an outdoor stadium like Foxboro during the winter because of the lower temperature on the field than in the officials pre-game locker room) is the texture and feel of the covering and the strings on the ball. It's the texture of the ball the equipment manager is supposed to mold into the state the QB prefers. Beyond that, individual QBs prefer a softer or harder ball, inflated to different pressures, but the other factors are of equal if not higher importance. I believe that is an accurate summary of what Zolak said in his interview.

      Again, the Patriot's center reportedly claimed he did not notice anything unusual about the squishiness of the footballs that were used in the first half of the AFL game. If anyone should have noticed something was out of whack, apart from the QB, it would be his center. Was he lying? I don't know the answer to that.

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    3. Exactly. This is all so much BS. The irrational NYC Jets - obsessed press.

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  2. Is there a Pete Rose parallel here?

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  3. Don, stick to politics... The BROWNS? The bitterness of your tirade belies some envy.

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    1. Hey, I have been a Brown fan most of my 61 years, so don't deny me my Bitterness and Envy :)
      On the other hand, glad you like my politics

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  4. One of my sons suggested that the league look into the rate of fumbles by players before they played for NE, that while they played for NE, and afterward. I bet that would be some pretty revealing stuff.

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    1. Why would that be so "revealing"? Avoiding mistakes is the key to winning championships. Belichick knows that. If in practice the Patriots coaching staff emphasizes technique in ball-handling, you'd expect Belichick's teams to take more care with how they handle the ball during games. Whatever the sport, winning teams have more take-aways than give-aways. Players who leave the Patriots in free agency often compliment Belichick, especially his emphasis on basics, saying they learned more about football from him than any other coach they've played for. I think Belichick is a mediocre GM at best, but his attention to detail as a coach is top-notch.

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  5. Of course none of these things will happen. There will be some minimal "punishment" to maintain the pretense of integrity for those who haven't already decided that the NFL is just TV Wrestling with a bigger ad budget.

    As for how the deflation could be done so quickly without someone noticing - simple, tire deflators as used on 4X4s for off-roading. They screw on the end of a valve stem and can be set to let air out to a desired pressure. Put one on the end of a ball inflating needle and all you have to do is push it in the ball and wait a few seconds. I'm sure that with a little practice anyone could do it blindfolded. Hey, maybe that's part of the Patriots training program!

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    1. The balls were not underinflated to even close to the same pressures. The officials found a wide range in air pressure when they checked the dozen suspect Patriots game balls at half-time. Their measurements are listed in the technical appendix to the Wells report. if McNally did deflate the footballs, he didn't use a sophisticated tool; it had to be manually, as crude as it gets, in a big rush to avoid suspicion: grab a ball out of the ball bag, push the needle in to let air out, count to three or four, pull the needle out, put the ball aside, reach into the bag and grab another one, repeat again a dozen times, then finally cram all the loose footballs on the bathroom floor back into the bag It's probably doable, even by a lone perpetrator, but it doesn't leave a lot of room for error from overdoing it. If too much air were let out of any ball, say by 3 pounds of pressure, the game officials would have readily detected that as soon as the ball was put into play on the field. That means the scheme had to be planned and well practiced ahead of time in order to minimize the chance of letting out too much air.

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  6. At least the NFL isn't as feckless when doing investigations as the obama administration... "Brady must have known" is a conviction," while "What difference does it make," is absolution.... I do like your politics, and I don't hold the fact that you are a Browns Fan against you. Top down.... ride on friend !

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