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Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Muslim compassion

Add Malaysia and Indonesia to the growing list of nations that are turning political refugees away.

AP reported:
Abandoned at sea, thousands of Bangladeshis and members of Myanmar’s long-persecuted Rohingya Muslim minority appear to have no place to go after two Southeast Asian nations refused to offer refuge to boatloads of hungry men, women and children.
The United Nations pleaded for countries in the region to keep their borders open and help rescue those stranded.
Actually, they are not abandoned at sea. They chose to board those boats, but we do know in our hearts the desperation they face. Malaysia and Indonesia are Muslim countries and unlike terrorism, you cannot say this action does not reflect the true Muslim religion. I don't see anyone saying we are our brother's keeper.

This is a dangerous game. A little over 75 years ago, 937 Jewish passengers boarded the German ocean liner MS St. Louis, captained by Gustav Schröder, in Hamburg for Havana on May 13, 1939, in a desperate attempt to escape Nazi Germany. Cuba refused their entry. So did the United States. And Canada. The Voyage of the Damned returned to  Antwerp, Belgium, on June 17, 1939.

England agreed to take 288, France 224, Belgium 214, and the Netherlands took the remaining 181.

These are political refugees knocking on the front door, not gang-bangers and welfare moms hopping the backyard fence.

3 comments:

  1. The Bangladeshis are economic refugees, not political or religious refugees. Legally that makes a difference as to whether countries are obligated to accept them, right? On the other hand, Bangladesh is a Muslim country, so is Indonesia, which I suspect, admittedly without researching it, has more than enough land on its many different islands within the archipelago to accommodate the influx of uninvited refugees it faces. Whether Indonesia has enough money and other resources to properly resettle so many people is another matter. That's where the UN has a role to play, I think.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "That's where the UN has a role to play, I think." And badly will they play it.

      Delete
    2. Excuse me Sam. With all due respect, I find a deficiency in your statement about the UN. Please let me correct it.
      "And BADLY will they play it."
      I wish I could have made it bigger too.

      Delete